Economics

Glendon College

Location: 327 York Hall, Tel.: 416-487-6712
Chair: V. Hildebrand
Professor: X. de Vanssay
Associate Professors: C. Erutku, O. F. Hamouda, V. Hildebrand, M. Lavoie
Associate Professors Emeriti: J. R. Savary, N. S. Tryphonopoulos
Assistant Professor: N.-G. Martineau
Assistant Professor Emeritus: J. I. McDonald

Note: GL/ECON 1000 3.00 (formerly GL/ECON 2500 3.00) and GL/ECON 1010 3.00 (formerly GL/ECON 2510 3.00) are prerequisites for all economics courses except the following: GL/ECON 1500 3.00, GL/ECON 1680 6.00 (formerly GL/ECON 2680 6.00), GL/ECON 3670 3.00, GL/ECON 2710 3.00 and GL/ECON 2720 3.00.

Note: the following courses are open to first-year students: GL/ECON 1000 3.00 (formerly GL/ECON 2500 3.00), GL/ECON 1010 3.00 (formerly GL/ECON 2510 3.00), GL/ECON 1680 6.00 (formerly GL/ECON 2680 6.00), GL/ECON 2510 3.00.

Economics is offered by Glendon College and the Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies.

University-Wide Residency Requirement

A minimum of 30 course credits and at least half (50 per cent) of the course credits required in each undergraduate degree program major/minor must be taken at York University.

Faculty-Wide Degree Requirements

Note: in these regulations the term academic session refers to the period from the beginning of instruction in September until the end of the annual examinations in the spring; academic year refers to the period from September 1 to August 31; year of study refers to the division of degree studies according to the number of courses already satisfactorily completed.

All inquiries about regulations and requirements shall be addressed to the Academic Services Office.

Students must follow the undergraduate calendar requirements for the year they entered or switched into their program.

Regulations for the Bachelor of Arts Degree

1. Requirements for a Bachelor of Arts

1.1 Bilingualism

1.1.1 Students admitted to an undergraduate degree program at Glendon must satisfy the bilingual requirement at Glendon.

1.1.2 Students must take a language placement assessment to determine their appropriate level of French and/or English.

1.1.3 In order to satisfy the bilingual requirement, students must successfully complete at least six credits in each official language (French and English) at Glendon from the following two categories:

1.1.3.1 Courses at the second-year level and above in French as a second language and/or in English as a second language;

1.1.3.2 Courses in any discipline which are designated as satisfying the bilingual requirement. A student who wants to satisfy the bilingual requirement with courses other than FRLS, FSL and ENSL must submit to the Academic Services Office a Bilingual Requirement form signed by the course instructor stating that they completed all of the required course work, tests and exams in the language of instruction of the course.

1.1.4 The following courses are not eligible for the bilingual requirement:

GL/FRLS 0400 6.00
All FRLS 1000-level courses
All FSL 1000-level courses
All ENSL 1000-level courses
All SP courses
GL/HUMA 2500 6.00
GL/HUMA 3200 6.00
GL/HUMA 3400 6.00
All courses taught in two languages or in any language other than English and French.

1.2 General Education

1.2.1 Every BA student in the college shall complete the equivalent of at least six credits in each of three of four general education divisions: humanities, modes of reasoning, natural science, social science. For detailed information about these divisions, see the description under multidisciplinary studies. Courses that are cross-listed between two or more general education divisions may only be counted to satisfy the requirement for one division; e.g. NATS 1605 which is cross listed with SOSC 1605 can be counted as either a Natural Science or as a Social Science, but not as both.

1.3 Major

1.3.1 In addition to taking courses which contribute to their broad knowledge, students are required to specialize in a specific subject or combination of subjects. The area of primary concentration is known as the major; an area of secondary concentration (if any) is known as the minor. In a double major program, a course may count for major credit towards only one major. In a major/minor program, a course may count only for major credit or for minor credit. Students may choose to major or minor in a specific subject when they enter the University or they may wait until they have completed up to 24 credits.

1.3.2 Courses may not be double counted in order to fulfill major requirements. For example, if GL/FRAN 3600 6.00 is cross-listed to GL/DRST 3600 6.00, it may be counted as a French studies course or a drama studies course, but not as both.

1.4 Upper Level Requirement

1.4.1 Every student in an Honours bachelor of arts degree must complete at least 36 credits at the 3000 or 4000-level including at least 18 credits at the 4000-level. This includes the 3000- and 4000 level requirements in the major, and minor, if applicable.

1.4.2 Every student in a bachelor of arts degree must complete at least 18 credits at the 3000 or 4000 level. This includes the 3000- and 4000-level credits in the major.

1.5 Credits Outside the Major

1.5.1 Credits outside the major are courses that are intended to broaden the educational experience of students beyond their area of specialization. Every student in the College shall complete the equivalent of at least eighteen credits outside the major.* Courses used to fulfill minimum general education requirements do not satisfy the Credits Outside the Major.

*Notes:
1. This requirement is not applicable to Major/Minor and Double Major programs.

2. Courses taken in French as a second language (e.g., FSL courses) or in English as a second language (e.g., ENSL courses) may be used to satisfy the Credits Outside the Major.

2. Requirements for an International Bachelor of Arts

2.1 There are two iBA program options at Glendon: Bilingual iBA or Trilingual iBA. Students may choose to switch to a BA program during the course of their studies or vice-versa depending on their academic standing. Please note that these requirements are in addition to the ones currently listed for the Bachelor of Arts.

2.2 Bilingualism or Trilingualism

2.2.1 Bilingualism

2.2.1.1 For the bilingual iBA, students must complete at least 18 credits in each official language (English and French). At least 6 of these credits must be completed at Glendon from the following two categories: a) French as a second language and/or in English as a second language at the 2000 level or above or b) discipline courses which are designated as satisfying the bilingual requirement. The remaining 12 credits in either official language may be completed abroad*.

2.2.1.2 The following courses are not eligible for the bilingual requirement:

GL/FRLS 0400 6.00
All FRLS 1000-level courses
All FSL 1000-level courses
All ENSL 1000-level courses
All SP courses
GL/HUMA 2500 6.00
GL/HUMA 3200 6.00
GL/HUMA 3400 6.00
All courses taught in two languages or in any language other than English and French.

*Note: All equivalents completed at a designated partner institution during the semester or year abroad are subject to approval by Academic Services, including those used to satisfy the bilingual component of the IBA. For courses taken in a student’s second language while on exchange, a Language Requirement form must be completed by the instructor and submitted to the Office of Academic Services.

2.2.2 Trilingualism

2.2.2.1 For the trilingual iBA, in addition to the above 18 credits in English and French, students must complete 18 credits in Hispanic studies or in a modern language offered by York University. Six of the 18 credits must be at an advanced level (e.g. GL/SP 2100 6.00 orGL/SP 3000 6.00 will be accepted for Hispanic Studies).

2.3 Internationally-oriented Courses

2.3.1 Every student registered in the international Bachelor of Arts must complete at least 12 credits of internationally-oriented courses.

2.3.2 The list of approved internationally-oriented courses can be found online: http://www.glendon.yorku.ca/academic-services/degree-requirements/internationally-oriented-courses/.

2.4 Exchange Program

2.4.1 Every student registered in the international Bachelor of Arts must complete at least one full term abroad as a full-time student at an institution with which Glendon and/or York has a formal exchange agreement. Students are required to pass a minimum of 9 credits for a half-year exchange, or 18 credits for a full-year exchange.

2.5 General Education

2.5.1 Every student registered in a Bachelor of Arts degree in the college shall complete the equivalent of at least six credits in each of three of four general education divisions: humanities, modes of reasoning, natural science, social science. For detailed information about these divisions, see the description under multidisciplinary studies. Courses that are cross-listed between two or more general education divisions may only be counted to satisfy the requirement for one division; e.g. NATS 1605 which is cross listed with SOSC 1605 can be counted as either a Natural Science or as a Social Science, but not as both.

2.6 Major

2.6.1 In addition to taking courses which contribute to their broad knowledge, students are required to specialize in a specific subject or combination of subjects. The area of primary concentration is known as the major; an area of secondary concentration (if any) is known as the minor. In a double major program, a course may count for major credit towards only one major. In a major/minor program, a course may count only for major credit or for minor credit. Students may choose to major or minor in a specific subject when they enter the University or they may wait until they have completed up to 24 credits.

2.6.2 Courses may not be double counted in order to fulfill major requirements. For example, if GL/FRAN 3600 6.00 is cross-listed toGL/DRST 3600 6.00, it may be counted as a French studies course or a drama studies course, but not as both.

2.7 Upper Level Requirement

2.7.1 Every student in an Honours Bachelor of Arts degree must complete at least 36 credits at the 3000 or 4000-level including at least 18 credits at the 4000-level. This includes the 3000- and 4000 level requirements in the major, and minor, if applicable.

2.7.2 Every student in a Bachelor of Arts degree must complete at least 18 credits at the 3000 or 4000 level. This includes the 3000- and 4000-level credits in the major.

2.8 Credits Outside the Major

2.8.1 Credits outside the major are courses that are intended to broaden the educational experience of students beyond their area of specialization. Every student in the College shall complete the equivalent of at least eighteen credits outside the major*. Courses used to fulfill minimum general education requirements do not satisfy the Credits Outside the Major.

*Notes:
1. This requirement is not applicable to Major/Minor and Double Major programs.

2. Courses taken in French as a second language (e.g., FSL courses) or in English as a second language (e.g., ENSL courses) may be used to satisfy the Credits Outside the Major.

3. Undergraduate Degrees

3.1 Honours Bachelor of Arts (Honours BA)

3.1.1 The Honours Bachelor of Arts (Specialized Honours BA, Honours BA, Honours Double Major BA, Honours Major/Minor BA) program requires at least 120 credits with a cumulative overall and major average of 5.00 (C+).

3.2 Honours International Bachelor of Arts (Honours iBA)

3.2.1 The Honours international bachelor of arts (Specialized Honours iBA, Honours iBA, Honours Double Major iBA, Honours Major/Minor iBA) program requires at least 120 credits with a cumulative overall and major average of 5.00 (C+).

3.3 Bachelor of Arts (BA)

3.3.1 Bachelor of Arts (BA) programs require at least 90 credits with a cumulative overall and major average of 4.00 (C) and involve limited concentration in only one declared subject area.

4. Honours Degree (BA and iBA) – Standing and Grade Point Average (GPA) Requirements

4.1 For graduation with an Honours degree, students must have successfully completed at least 120 credits and must have obtained the requisite cumulative average in the major and overall. The year level of study for Honours students is determined by the number of credits successfully completed (see below):

Year Level Number of Credits
1 Fewer than 24
2 Fewer than 54
3 Fewer than 84
4 At least 84

4.2 Subject to the selection criteria of the major department(s), students registered in an Honours program must maintain the following cumulative averages:

Number of credits taken Cumulative Major Average Cumulative Overall Average
Fewer than 24 - 4.00
Fewer than 54 - 4.25
Fewer than 84 4.50 4.80
At least 84 5.00 5.00

4.3 Students who have taken 84 credits, and who wish to proceed in an Honours program must have a cumulative grade point average of 5.00 in their major and 5.00 overall.

4.4 Students who do not maintain the cumulative overall average requirements will be reclassified as bachelor of arts degree students. No student may graduate with an Honours degree if the student’s cumulative overall and major averages do not meet the fourth-year requirements.

4.5 Candidates who fail to meet the cumulative overall or major averages for an Honours program will be allowed to continue in bachelor of arts degree studies or to qualify for the bachelor of arts degree provided that their standing is sufficient to warrant this; or they may petition to have their session counted as a failure and excluded from their cumulative overall average. They will then be placed on academic probation (see Regulation 31).

4.6 Students who have successfully completed the third year of Honours degree studies and who have fulfilled the requirements for the bachelor of arts degree or who expect to have done so on completion of the current session, may be awarded the bachelor of arts degree by applying to the Academic Services Office no later than January 31.

4.7 Students who have been permitted to take the bachelor of arts degree in accordance with Regulation 4.6 may apply for re-admission to fourth-year Honours studies in the Honours subject(s) previously carried in third year and, if re-admitted, will have their BA degree reclassified with Honours upon successful completion of their fourth-year program.

5. Bachelor of Arts Degree - Standing and Grade Point Average (GPA) Requirements

5.1 For graduation with a bachelor of arts degree students must have 90 credits and must have obtained the requisite cumulative average in the major and overall. The year level of study for bachelor of arts degree students is determined by the number of credits completed (see below):

Year Level Number of Credits
1 Fewer than 24
2 Fewer than 54
3 At least 54

5.2 Students enrolled in a bachelor of arts degree program must maintain a cumulative average as follows:

Year Level Cumulative Major Average Cumulative Overall Average
1 - 3.60
2 - 3.80
3 4.00 4.00

5.3 A major in the bachelor program shall consist of 30 or more credits in the discipline chosen. (For specific requirements in each discipline, candidates should consult the schedule of courses offered in that discipline.)

5.4 Transfer from the bachelor to the Honours program: students in the third year of a bachelor of arts degree program who have achieved Honours standing will be permitted to transfer to the Honours program. Students who have graduated in the bachelor of arts degree program may apply for admission to fourth year of an Honours program and, if re-admitted, will be eligible to have their degree reclassified with Honours if their cumulative overall and major averages meet the fourth-year requirements.

5.5 Students who fail to meet graduation requirements for the bachelor of arts degree or Honours degree may take additional credits, selected with the approval of Academic Services, for the purpose of raising their cumulative and/or major grade point average to the level required for graduation.

6. Number of Courses Required for a Second or Subsequent BA Degree

6.1 Students who have completed an undergraduate degree or equivalent at an accredited postsecondary institution, and who wish to earn a BA through Glendon in a different subject may be admitted to the BA program on the following conditions:

6.1.1 Students must have achieved a cumulative grade point average of 5.00 on all previous courses for admission to an Honours program or a cumulative grade point average of 4.00 on all previous courses for admission to a bachelor program;

6.1.2 Students must satisfy the following in-Faculty requirements :

  • a minimum of 30 new credits at York;
  • at least 50 per cent of the credits required for a major and minor must be taken at Glendon.

Note: courses taken in fulfillment of the first degree may not be used to meet these requirements.

6.1. 3 The in-Faculty requirements must be regarded as the minimum number of additional courses; 
all Glendon-specific degree requirements must also be fulfilled  (see Regulations 1 and 2).

7. Changes in Program

7.1 Students may change their degree program or major or Honours subject, providing they have the required standing and, if applicable, the approval of the department(s) concerned, by submitting an online program change request no later than October 30.

8. Residency Requirement

8.1 No student may receive a BA degree through Glendon unless the student has completed at least 30 credits of the program within York, including at least 50 per cent of the credits required in their major and minor within the Faculty of Glendon.

9. Transfer Credit

9.1 Students who, prior to entering Glendon, have attended an accredited postsecondary institution must arrange to have an official transcript of their records sent directly to the Admissions Office at York University. Students who have successfully completed courses at another accredited postsecondary institution may be considered for transfer credits.

9.2 Students transferring to Glendon with a bachelor of arts degree from another accredited postsecondary institution and wishing to obtain an Honours degree through Glendon must complete a program which meets the following conditions: completion of a minimum of 30 new credits at York, including at least 50 per cent of the credits required in their major and minor within the Faculty of Glendon. In addition to the above, students must also satisfy any further requirements of the major/minor department(s).

9.3 Glendon students pursuing a York degree must seek a letter of permission (LOP) in advance from the Academic Services Office for courses to be taken outside of York. Should a student leave York University to pursue studies at another postsecondary institution without a letter of permission, upon return to York, a new application to York is required and all previous transfer credit will be reassessed.

9.4 Courses taken at an accredited postsecondary institution other than York may be credited as courses taken and passed, provided that a grade of C/60 per cent or better is obtained. Actual grades will not be included in the cumulative averages. Transcripts should be submitted to the Academic Services Office.

9.5 Credit for courses taken at other York Faculties is granted on the same basis as for courses taken at Glendon.

10. Language Credit

10.1 Anglophone students who obtain a minimum of C in 12 credits taken entirely in French may apply for a Language Credit worth 6 credits.  Anglophone students who obtain a minimum of C in 6 credits taken entirely in French may apply for a Language Credit worth 3 credits. Francophone students who obtain a minimum of C in 12 credits taken entirely in English may apply for a Language Credit worth 6 credits. Francophone students who obtain a minimum of C in 6 credits taken entirely in English may apply for a Language Credit worth 3 credits.

Note: All written work submitted in connection with the course must be done in the language of the course, with the exception of non-take-home examinations.

10.2 The following courses are not eligible for the language credit:

GL/FRLS 0400 6.00
All FRLS 1000-level courses
All FSL courses
All ENSL courses
GL/HUMA 2500 6.00
GL/HUMA 3200 6.00
GL/HUMA 3400 6.00
All courses taught in two languages or in any language other than English and French.

10.3 Courses taken in the Department of French by English-speaking students majoring in French will not be counted for a language credit.

10.4 Language credit, either weighted at 3 credits or 6 credits, will reduce the number of electives available in the degree.  Students must still complete all degree requirements.

10.5 The language credit will only appear on a student’s record upon graduation from Glendon. Students who transfer to another faculty of York university or another university will not receive language credit. Some graduate schools do not recognize the language credit as equivalent to a course.

Note: Although students majoring in the Translation program are not eligible to receive the language credit, anglophone students who complete their second year in a francophone university may receive a 6 credit or a 3 credit language credit at the discretion of the school depending on the number of courses completed and the grades obtained.

11. Exchange Programmes

11.1 Students in an Honours degree program may receive credit towards a Glendon degree for a semester or year’s study through an official exchange program with York University or Glendon. Enquiries should be addressed to the Office of the Associate Principal, Student Services and Coordinator of Student Exchange Program. Students re-entering Glendon after such a year of study, do not reapply for admission, but must provide transcripts from the host institution for transfer credit assessment.

12. English/French as a Second Language

12.1 All students admitted to the college whose mother tongue is a language other than English are required to take an English language placement test before registering.

12.2 All students admitted to the college whose mother tongue is a language other than French are required to take a French as a Second language placement test before registering, since all students are required to meet Glendon’s Bilingual Requirement. Those students who are majoring in a subject other than French Studies will be placed in the FSL stream of French on the basis of their test results. French Studies majors will be placed in the FRLS/FRAN stream.

13. Interfaculty Transfer

13.1 Students seeking information about inter-Faculty transfer should contact the Academic Services Office.

14. Class Hours

14.1 Unless otherwise noted, all courses meet for three hours per week.

15. Course Numbering System

15.1 Glendon courses are denoted by the Faculty prefix GL. The year of study in which a course is normally offered is indicated by the first digit (1, 2, 3,4).

15.2 Full courses are indicated by 6.00 following the course number, generally run through the year (Y) or summer (SU) semester. Half courses, offered in the fall (F) winter (W) or half-summer (S1 or S2, S3) term, are distinguished by 3.00 following the course number.

16. Cross-Listed Courses

16.1 A course which is cross-listed in more than one department or division usually has the second digit 6 or 9 and is described only under the department or division by which the course is given.

16.2 A general education course cross-listed as a departmental course may be used to satisfy both the general education and the departmental requirements.

16.3 A course cross-listed in two or more departments may be used to satisfy the requirement of one major or minor only.

17. Exemption from Curricular Requirements

17.1 Students may fulfill curriculum requirements with passed courses for which they did not receive credit and which were excluded from their cumulative total of courses.

18. Enrolment in Courses

18.1 A normal course load is 30 credits during the fall/winter session and 15 credits during the summer session.   Full-time students are registered in a minimum of 18 credits in the fall/winter session and 9 credits during the summer session.

18.2 Students who are on probation normally do not take more than 18 credits during the fall/winter session and 9 credits during the summer session. Waiver of this regulation can only be granted under extenuating circumstances by request submitted to the Office of Academic Services.

18.3 Part-time students are registered in less than 18 credits during the fall/winter session or 9 credits during the summer session.

18.4 Enrolment is permitted in full and half courses within the deadlines published in the enrolment guide. Enrolments at later dates will be made only with the written permission of all course directors and Chairs of the departments involved. Withdrawals are permitted as outlined in Regulation 19.

18.5 At the time of registration, all students, except those in first year, must register in a major discipline or disciplines.

18.6 Students wishing to take courses more than one year above or below their year must secure approval of the department or division offering the course.

18.7 First year students may be admitted to 2000-level courses so long as they meet any applicable prerequisite requirements.

18.8 These regulations are subject to the provision that a course may be closed by departments and divisions when space is no longer available.

18.9 All students who are permitted to register in courses offered in a year below their own year should note that the standards employed in assigning and assessing their work in these courses will be such as are generally appropriate for courses in their own year.

18.10 Repeating Courses

18.10.1 Students may repeat a passed or failed course twice for academic degree or certificate credit, for a maximum of three (3) attempts at a course. Students should note that course availability and space considerations may preclude the possibility of repeating a course in the session they choose.

18.10.2 When a student repeats a course for academic degree or certificate credit, the grade of the latest attempt will be the grade of record and the only grade calculated in the student’s grade point average (Major, Sessional and Cumulative). A course shall be credited only once towards the satisfaction of degree or certificate academic credit requirements.

18.10.3 The record of each attempt will appear on the student’s transcript, with the prior attempt(s) designated as 'No Credit Retained'. The grade awarded in the prior attempts will continue to appear on the transcript beside the NCR designation but will not be included in the calculation of the student’s grade point average.

18.10.4 Cross-listed courses and course credit exclusions count as a course repeat and are subject to 18.10.3 above.

18.10.5 Students who have been conferred a degree may repeat courses counted towards their degree thereafter as a Non-Degree Student. Such courses will have no impact on the student’s completed degree program or the grade point average on record.

19. Withdrawal from Courses

19.1 Students may withdraw from a course before the deadline to receive a grade. The dates are published on the University website.

20. Withdrawal from Glendon

20.1 Students may withdraw from the college before the deadlines outlined in Regulation 19 without incurring any academic penalty.

20.2 If a student withdraws after the deadlines without approval of the petitions committee, grades will be entered on the student’s official record. The student will be placed on academic probation and will be required to apply for reactivation if the student wishes to resume studies at Glendon in some subsequent session.

20.3 Under some circumstances the college may require students to withdraw involuntarily.

21. Auditing Courses

21.1 Students may audit a course on the understanding that they attend classes and participate in a course in the same way as other students, but do not submit assignments or write tests or examinations.

21.2 No academic credit will be granted to students who audit a course. Before attending classes, auditors must obtain permission of the instructor and notify the Academic Services Office.

22. Standing

22.1 Students shall obtain a standard of work in their courses of instruction satisfactory to the departments or divisions concerned, and they shall attend examinations, unless prevented by illness or by some other special circumstance.

23. Grading System

23.1 All courses at Glendon are graded on the following system:

Letter Point Value Percentage Grade Definition
A+ 9 90-100 Exceptional
A 8 80-89 Excellent
B+ 7 75-79 Very Good
B 6 70-74 Good
C+ 5 65-69 Competent
C 4 60-64 Fairly Competent
D+ 3 55-59 Passing
D 2 50-54 Barely Passing
E 1 40-49 Marginally Failing
F 0 0-39 Failing


P Ungraded Pass
F Ungraded Fail

24. Pass/Fail Alternative Grading Option

24.1 Students may take a limited number of courses for full degree credit (see 24.2.4) on an ungraded (pass/fail alternative grading option) basis. Courses taken on this basis are listed on the transcript as P for pass or as F for fail. Neither of these two grades is calculated into the student’s grade point averages.

24.2 The following regulations apply to courses to be taken on an ungraded (pass/fail alternative grading option) basis:

24.2.1 Academic standing: only students who are in good standing, (i.e. not on temporary probation, academic warning or debarment warning) are allowed to take such courses.

24.2.2 Prerequisite: students may apply to take such courses only after they have successfully completed 24 credits.

24.2.3 Courses taken on an ungraded (pass/fail alternative grading option) basis cannot be used to satisfy major, minor, general education, certificate or outside the major requirements.

24.2.4 Maximum number of ungraded courses:

24.2.4.1 Honours program: students registered in an Honours program are allowed to take up to 12 credits on an ungraded (pass/fail alternative grading option) basis.

24.2.4.2 Bachelor program: students registered in a bachelor program are allowed to take up to six credits on an ungraded (pass/fail alternative grading option) basis.

24.3 Deadline: students who wish to designate a course as ungraded must do so by submitting a completed Pass/Fail Option form to Academic Services within the first two weeks of the term in which the course begins.

24.4 Changing from ungraded to graded: students may change the designation of a course from ungraded to graded by submitting a completed Pass/Fail to Graded Form to Academic Services by the last day to withdraw from that course without academic penalty.

25. Definitions of Standing

25.1 Exceptional: thorough knowledge of concepts and/or techniques and exceptional skill or great originality in the use of those concepts, techniques in satisfying the requirements of an assignment or course.

25.2 Excellent: thorough knowledge of concepts and/or techniques together with a high degree of skill and/or some elements of originality in satisfying the requirements of an assignment or course.

25.3 Very Good: thorough knowledge of concepts and/or techniques together with a fairly high degree of skill in the use of those concepts, techniques in satisfying the requirements of an assignment or course.

25.4 Good: good level of knowledge of concepts and/or techniques together with considerable skill in using them to satisfy the requirements of an assignment or course.

25.5 Competent: acceptable level of knowledge of concepts and/or techniques together with considerable skill in using them to satisfy requirements of an assignment or course.

25.6 Fairly Competent: acceptable level of knowledge of concepts and/or techniques together with some skill in using them to satisfy the requirements of an assignment or course.

25.7 Passing: slightly better than minimal knowledge of required concepts and/or techniques together with some ability to use them in satisfying the requirements of an assignment or course.

25.8 Barely Passing: minimum knowledge of concepts and/or techniques needed to satisfy the requirements of an assignment or course.

25.9 Cumulative overall average: the sum of the point value of all courses taken (including those failed) divided by the number of courses. For purposes of computing averages, half courses receive half the weight of a full course.

25.10 Cumulative major average: the sum of the point value of all courses taken in the major (including those failed) divided by the number of courses. Major indicates the area of concentration which students must select in one of four programs: a) Specialized Honours, b) Honours Major/Minor, c) Honours, d) bachelor.

25.11 Credit: is given for all York University courses in which a D or better is achieved.

25.12 First Class Standing: awarded on graduation to students with a cumulative overall average of at least 7.50. All students with a cumulative overall average of 7.50 are eligible for inclusion in the Dean’s Honour Roll.

26. First Term Progress Reports

26.1 Course directors are required to report to the Academic Services Office the names of any students who are obtaining less than 3.00 (D+) in the following categories:

26.1.1 Students on probation (see also Regulation 31)

26.1.2 First year students (see also Regulation 20.3)

27. Submission of Term Work

27.1 Term work in half courses given in the first term shall be submitted by the end of the December examination period. Term work in all other courses shall be submitted by the Friday of the first week of the annual examination period unless an earlier date has been set by the instructor in consultation with the students. Where there is no final examination in a course, no student may be required to submit their last piece of term work before the first day of the examination period.

28. Examinations

28.1 Final examinations are held during December for half courses offered in the first term and in April or May for half courses offered in the second term and for full courses. During the summer session, exams are held in the final weeks of the term in question.

28.1.1. Examinations and assignments for students who have successfully petitioned for deferment on the grounds of illness or misfortune will be scheduled by instructors and will take place before the due dates published online:http://www.glendon.yorku.ca/academic-services/advising-resources/academic-forms/deferred-standing-agreement/. Petitions for deferred standing must be initiated by the student no later than five working days after the end of examination period for the appropriate term.

28.1.2. Faculty legislation specifies that no tests or examinations collectively worth more than 20 per cent of the final grade will be given in the final two weeks of classes in a term. The exceptions to the rule are classes which regularly meet Friday evenings or the weekend (Saturday and Sunday at any time) and courses offered in the compressed summer terms. Tests or examinations scheduled during the term must be held within the hours regularly scheduled for that course; such tests or examinations may be held in other hours only if no students’ obligations are infringed upon. Students have the right to refuse, without penalty, an exam held in contravention of this regulation.

28.2 Departments and divisions may waive final examinations by substituting a variety of written and oral tests in courses that do not require the evaluation of a final examination.

28.3 All written work, including examinations, may be done in English or French at the student’s option, except in cases where the use of the language constitutes an integral and essential part of the course concerned. Students will be duly notified of any restrictions concerning the use of either language.

28.4 Students should report any conflicts, i.e. two or more examinations scheduled for the same time, without delay to the Academic Services Office.

29. Final Grades

29.1 All final grades are calculated on the basis of a specific weighting scale set by the department or division concerned and may or may not include a final examination (written or oral). Students will be notified by their instructors shortly after the commencement of classes of the weighting scale and grading system assigned to each course.

30. Reappraisal of Final Grades

30.1 Examination scripts and class records of students are carefully assessed. However, a written request for reappraisal may be made to the Chair of the department or division in which the course is offered within three weeks of the release of the final grades in any term. Applicants must state clearly in the petition the reasons why they believe that their work in the course deserves a higher rating.

30.2 Reappraisals are dealt with by the Chair of the department, or course director, in consultation with members of the staff. The student and Academic Services will be notified in writing of the results within three weeks of the request.

31. Academic Probation

31.1 The academic records of all students are reviewed at the end of each year of study.

31.2 Students are placed on probation when they: a) are admitted with a marginal academic record; b) fail to obtain the required cumulative overall average for their year level.

31.3 They are removed from probation when they obtain the required cumulative overall average for their year level.

31.4 They may proceed on probation in the bachelor program if they maintain a 4.40 average on the courses taken while on probation, even if their cumulative average is below the minimum to be removed from probation.

31.5 They are debarred from further registration if they do not satisfy Regulation 31.3 or 31.4 above.

31.6 Students who fail to obtain the cumulative average for their year and whose average for the current year is below 3.00, will have failed the year, and will receive no credit for courses taken in that year. The grades will appear on their record but will not enter into the calculation of their cumulative averages. If they wish to continue their studies at Glendon, they must apply for reactivation, and, if accepted, will be placed on academic probation.

31.7 Students who are not debarred may petition by the closing date for registration of the next academic session in which they register to have their last year (or equivalent) counted as a failed year. The students would be placed on probation.

31.8 Students who are on probation normally do not take more than 18 credits during the fall/winter session and 9 credits during the summer session. Waiver of this regulation can only be granted under extenuating circumstances by request submitted to the Office of Academic Services.

31.9 Students on probation who do not attain at the end of the first term a cumulative average of more than 3.00 (D+) should discuss the situation with their adviser.

32. Debarment

32.1 Students on probation will be debarred from the University if they fail to satisfy Regulation 31.3 or 31.4.

32.2 Students who have been debarred, whether at York or another university, may be re-admitted in some subsequent session only if they give convincing evidence that they can profit from university work. Application for readmission will not be entertained in less than two years from date of debarment.

33. Special Provisions for Illness and Misfortune

33.1 Students who suffer unforeseeable hardship during an academic session, which makes it impossible to complete assigned work in the allotted time, may receive special consideration. The recognized categories of hardship are:

  • illness
  • personal misfortune
  • unforeseeable economic hardship
  • academic misfortune (unforeseeable inability to obtain necessary research materials or a confirmed error on the part of the institution).

33.2 Students may petition through the Academic Services Office, if they have appropriate evidence, for:

33.2.1 Withdrawal from any number of courses without penalty. Normally petitions for late withdrawal from a course will only be considered if they are submitted within three weeks of the release of final grades in any term. Such petitions may be considered for a period of up to one year if they are based on special circumstances.

33.2.2 Deferred standing in one or more courses, for work expected to be in progress during the period of hardship.

33.2.3 Aegrotat standing in one or more courses. Aegrotat standing shall not be granted in more than one year of study and will seldom be granted in any but the final year.

Note: there are deadlines for all petitions. Check with the Academic Services Office.

34. Certificate of Bilingualism - French and English

34.1 To receive the Certificate of Bilingualism, students must successfully complete at least 18 credits in their second language with a minimum grade of C in each course. These courses must be at the second-year level and above in French as a Second Language and in English as a Second Language or any courses at any level in another discipline of the college which are designated as satisfying the bilingual requirements.

35. Certificate of Bilingual Excellence - English and French

35.1 Students who successfully pass the Glendon examination of bilingual excellence will receive the Certificate of Bilingual Excellence. Information about registering for the exam is available from the Academic Services Office.

35.2 Eligibility:

35.2.1 To sit for this exam, students must fulfill the following requirements:

35.2.2 Students whose declared language is English must:

  • be registered and enrolled in a York degree program.
  • be in their final year of studies and submit an application by the annually announced deadline.
  • have obtained or be reasonably certain of obtaining a minimum grade of B in 18 credits taken in French.

35.2.3 Courses which are acceptable are: FRLS and FSL courses at the 2000 level or above, FRAN courses and courses designated as satisfying the bilingual requirement from any discipline of the college. For courses other than FRLS and FSL, a Bilingual Requirement form signed by the course instructor must be submitted to the Academic Services Office.

35.2.4 Students whose declared language is French must:

  • be registered and enrolled in a York degree program;
  • be in their final year of studies and submit an application by the annually announced deadline;
  • have obtained or be reasonably certain of obtaining a minimum grade of B in 18 credits taken in English.

35.2.5 Courses which are acceptable are: ENSL courses at the 2000 level or above, EN courses and courses designated as satisfying the bilingual requirement from any discipline of the college. For courses other than ENSL, a Bilingual Requirement form signed by the course instructor must be submitted to the Academic Services Office.

Note: courses taken outside of York University, which meet the above criteria, are acceptable for the purposes of sitting for the Glendon examination of bilingual excellence.

36. Certificate of Trilingual Excellence - English, French and Spanish

36.1 Students who successfully pass the Glendon examination of trilingual excellence will receive the Certificate of Trilingual Excellence. Information about registering for the exam is available from the Academic Services Office.

36.2 Eligibility:

36.2.1 To sit for this exam, students must fulfill the following requirements:

36.2.1.1 Non-hispanophone students must:

  • be registered in a York degree program;
  • fulfill the relevant second-language requirement as set out in the regulations for the Certificate of Bilingual Excellence (see section 35.2);
  • have obtained or be reasonably certain of obtaining a minimum grade of B in 18 credits taken in Spanish.
  • Courses which are acceptable are: SP courses at the 2000 level or above.

36.2.1.2 Hispanophone students must:

  • be registered in a York degree program;
  • fulfill the relevant second-language requirement as set out in the regulations for the Certificate of Bilingual Excellence (see section 35.2);
  • obtain the approval of the coordinator for the Bilingual/Trilingual Excellence Exam.

Note: courses taken outside of York University, which meet the above criteria, are acceptable for the purposes of sitting for the Glendon examination of bilingual excellence.

37. Breach of Academic Honesty

37.1 Definitions

Consult the definitions contained in the Senate Policy on Academic Honesty, in the University Policy and Regulations section athttp://secretariat-policies.info.yorku.ca/. For further clarification, contact the Academic Services Office, C102 York Hall.

37.2 Procedures

See also detailed description of Senate procedures.

Note:once the process outlined in Sections B and D has begun, a student accused of academic dishonesty may not drop or be deregistered from the course in question until a final decision is reached. Requests for transcripts made during the process will be treated in accordance with the Senate Policy on Academic Honesty. A student who is suspended and is otherwise eligible to graduate may not apply to graduate until a suspension expires or is lifted.

  1. If, in the instructor’s informed view, the case may be dealt with informally by the instructor and the student involved, the two parties agree on the adopted measure. The case is closed at the departmental level.

or

  1. Cases in which the course director/instructor decides to proceed with an allegation of plagiarism, cheating or other form of academic dishonesty,

Step 1

The course director shall provide the Associate Principal, Student Services with a written summary of the circumstances and all evidence i.e.:

  • in cases involving cheating in an exam, the confiscated material;
  • in cases involving plagiarism, the work in question, all sources/books from which student has allegedly copied.

Note: Once Step 1 has begun, the student involved may not drop or be deregistered from the course in question unless it is determined that there was no breach.

Step 2

The Associate Principal, Student Services – as a neutral third party – will arrange to meet with the student and the course director/instructor (or delegate) – and will for this purpose notify the Director of Academic Services. The student will be informed, by letter, with at least seven calendar days’ notice, with a copy to the student’s file:

a) of the date, time and place of the meeting;

b) of the reason for such a meeting;

c) that the student may be accompanied by a representative, a family member or a friend at the meeting.

Step 3

At the meeting with the student, the course director/instructor shall:

a) outline the alleged offence to the student;

b) ask the student to respond to the allegation.

Step 4

a. No Breach

If following the above meeting, the course director/instructor is satisfied that there has been no breach of academic honesty, the Associate Principal, Student Services shall notify the student of the decision in person. All evidence submitted will then be destroyed and no record will be kept in the student’s academic file.

or

b. Breach

If following the above meeting, the Associate Principal, Student Services and the course director/instructor are of the belief that there has been a breach of academic honesty, the Associate Principal, Student Services shall ask the student if she/he will plead guilty or not guilty to the offence.

Step 5

Plea

a. Guilty Plea

If the student pleads guilty to a breach of academic honesty:

  • The Associate Principal, Student Services prepares the documents to be signed by the student and the course director/instructor, in the presence of the Associate Principal Student Services, outlining the nature of the offence, the penalty agreed upon by the student and the instructor (not to exceed failure on the assignment or in the test or exam) and the student’s admission to the charge. (If the instructor seeks a more severe penalty, then a hearing before the Committee on Academic Standards, Teaching and Learning (CASTL) must be held, as indicated in 7 below.)

Note:

The following penalties may be imposed singularly or in combination (but only a, b and c may be the subject of a joint recommendation):

a) oral or written disciplinary warning or reprimand;
b) a make-up assignment or examination;
c) lower grade or failure on the assignments or examination;
d) failure in the course;
e) suspension from the University for a definite period;
f) notation on transcript;
g) withholding or rescinding a York degree, diploma or certificate.

A permanent record of the offence will be placed in the student’s academic file, but this record is strictly confidential and can be cited only in the case of determining penalty in the event of a subsequent offence(s) of a breach of academic honesty.

  • the Associate Principal, Student Services sends a copy of the signed document and the documents indicated in B.1. above to:

    i) CASTL for review, and;

    ii) the Academic Services Office for student’s academic file. (Note: this record is for internal academic purposes only.)

In the absence of endorsement of the signed document, CASTL will call a hearing.

b. Not Guilty Plea - preparation for hearing

If the student pleads not guilty to the alleged offence, or if the course director/instructor seeks a penalty which exceeds failure in assignment/test/exam, or if CASTL does not approve the joint recommendation as to penalty, then a hearing is scheduled. The Associate Principal, Student Services submits to the secretary of CASTL, a report outlining:

  • the alleged offence and relevant circumstances
  • the meeting with the student and its outcome
  • all documents relating to the case.

The secretary of CASTL will arrange a hearing that will take place before CASTL. The student will be notified of the hearing by courier and will be given at least 21 calendar days’ notice of the hearing with copies to the Associate Principal, Student Services, the course director/instructor, the principal and all members of CASTL. The student will also be sent a written copy of the charge, a copy of the procedures to be followed and copies of all materials submitted by the faculty member and be informed that he/she may be accompanied by a representative and may call witnesses. The student may submit a written response.

Step 6

Hearing

A hearing shall take place before CASTL to consider the charges. At that hearing the Associate Principal, Student Services (or designate) shall act as presenter. The hearing shall be conducted according to the procedures mandated by the Senate Policy on Academic Honesty.

Step 7

If the student is found guilty, CASTL shall proceed to consider submissions as to the appropriate penalty.

Step 8

The secretary of CASTL shall inform the student by courier of the committee’s decision, and, in the case of a guilty verdict, of appeal procedures; a copy will also be sent to the department concerned and to the Academic Services Office.

A permanent record of the offence will be placed in the student’s academic file. This record is for internal academic purposes only.

Step 9

Appeal Procedures

The decision of the committee may be appealed to the Senate Appeals Committee on grounds of either new evidence (i.e. evidence which could not be presented at the Faculty level) or on procedural irregularity in the Faculty’s consideration of the case.

Program-Specific Degree Requirements

Specialized Honours BA: 120 Credits

Major credits: students must complete at least 60 credits (42 credits in Economics, 18 credits in Mathematics), including:

All MATH courses at the 1000 level must be taken by the end of the second year of study.

Note: It is strongly recommended that students who wish to pursue graduate studies in Economics take GL/ECON 3670 3.00 as well as GL/MATH 1660 3.00 and GL/MATH 2660 3.00.

General education requirement*: every BA student in the college shall complete the equivalent of at least six credits in each of three of the four general education divisions (for a total of 18 credits): humanities, modes of reasoning, natural science, social science.

Bilingual requirement*: all students admitted to Glendon must satisfy the bilingual requirement. In order to do so, students must successfully complete six credits in each official language (French and English) at Glendon from the following two categories:

  • courses at the second-year level and above in French as a Second Language and/or in English as a Second Language;
  • courses in any discipline which are designated as satisfying the bilingual requirement.

Upper-level credits*: at least 36 credits at the 3000 or 4000 level, including at least 18 credits at the 4000 level. This includes the 3000 and 4000 level credits in the major listed above (under major credits).

Credits outside the major*: at least 18 credits.

Residency requirement: a minimum of 30 credits at York and at least half (50 per cent) of the course credits required in each undergraduate degree program major/minor must be taken at Glendon.

Graduation requirement: students must successfully complete (pass) at least 120 credits which meet the Faculty's degree and program requirements with a cumulative grade point average of at least 5.00 (C+).

*Note: please refer to the Regulations for the Bachelor of Arts Degree section of the Undergraduate Calendar for detailed requirement information.

Specialized Honours iBA: 120 Credits

Major credits: students must complete at least 60 credits (42 credits in Economics, 18 credits in Mathematics), including:

All MATH courses at the 1000 level must be taken by the end of the second year of study.

Courses taken to fulfill the major requirements may also be used to fulfill the iBA requirements.

Note: It is strongly recommended that students who wish to pursue graduate studies in Economics take GL/ECON 3670 3.00 as well as GL/MATH 1660 3.00 and GL/MATH 2660 3.00.

General education requirement*: every BA student in the college shall complete the equivalent of at least six credits in each of three of the four general education divisions (for a total of 18 credits): humanities, modes of reasoning, natural science, social science.

Bilingual/trilingual requirement*: for the bilingual iBA, students must complete at least 18 credits in each official language (English and French). At least 6 of these credits must be completed at Glendon from the following two categories:

  • French as a Second Language and/or in English as a Second Language at the 2000 level or above;
  • discipline courses which are designated as satisfying the bilingual requirement.

The remaining 12 credits in either official language may be completed abroad.

For the iBA trilingual, in addition to the above 18 credits in each official language (English and French), students must complete 18 credits in Hispanic studies (including: GL/SP 3000 6.00) or six credits of an advanced-level course in Hispanic studies) or 18 credits in a modern language (including an advanced-level course) at York University.

Internationally-oriented course requirement*: at least 12 credits of internationally-oriented courses.

Exchange requirement*: at least one full term abroad as a full-time student at an institution with which Glendon and/or York has a formal exchange agreement. Students are required to pass a minimum of nine credits for a half-year exchange, or 18 credits for a full-year exchange.

Upper-level credits*: at least 36 credits at the 3000 or 4000 level, including at least 18 credits at the 4000 level. This includes the 3000 and 4000 level credits in the major listed above (under major credits).

Credits outside the major*: at least 18 credits.

Residency requirement: a minimum of 30 credits at York and at least half (50 per cent) of the course credits required in each undergraduate degree program major/minor must be taken at Glendon.

Graduation requirement: students must successfully complete (pass) at least 120 credits which meet the Faculty's degree and program requirements with a cumulative grade point average of at least 5.00 (C+).

*Note: please refer to the Regulations for the Bachelor of Arts Degree section of the Undergraduate Calendar for detailed requirement information.

Honours BA: 120 Credits

Major credits: students must complete at least 54 credits (42 credits in Economics, 12 credits in Mathematics), including:

All MATH courses at the 1000 level must be taken by the end of the second year of study.

Note: It is strongly recommended that students who wish to pursue graduate studies in Economics take both GL/ECON 3670 3.00 and GL/ECON 4270 3.00, as well as GL/MATH 1660 3.00, GL/MATH 2660 3.00 and GL/MATH 2670 6.00.

General education requirement*: every BA student in the college shall complete the equivalent of at least six credits in each of three of the four general education divisions (for a total of 18 credits): humanities, modes of reasoning, natural science, social science.

Bilingual requirement*: all students admitted to Glendon must satisfy the bilingual requirement. In order to do so, students must successfully complete six credits in each official language (French and English) at Glendon from the following two categories:

  • courses at the second-year level and above in French as a Second Language and/or in English as a Second Language;
  • courses in any discipline which are designated as satisfying the bilingual requirement.

Upper-level credits*: at least 36 credits at the 3000 or 4000 level, including at least 18 credits at the 4000 level. This includes the 3000 and 4000 level credits in the major listed above (under major credits).

Credits outside the major*: at least 18 credits.

Residency requirement: a minimum of 30 credits at York and at least half (50 per cent) of the course credits required in each undergraduate degree program major/minor must be taken at Glendon.

Graduation requirement: students must successfully complete (pass) at least 120 credits which meet the Faculty's degree and program requirements with a cumulative grade point average of at least 5.00 (C+).

*Note: please refer to the Regulations for the Bachelor of Arts Degree section of the Undergraduate Calendar for detailed requirement information.

Honours iBA: 120 Credits

Major credits: students must complete at least 54 credits (42 credits in Economics, 12 credits in Mathematics), including:

All MATH courses at the 1000 level must be taken by the end of the second year of study.

Courses taken to fulfill the major requirements may also be used to fulfill the iBA requirements.

Note: It is strongly recommended that students who wish to pursue graduate studies in Economics take both GL/ECON 3670 3.00 and GL/ECON 4270 3.00, as well as GL/MATH 1660 3.00, GL/MATH 2660 3.00 and GL/MATH 2670 6.00.

General education requirement*: every BA student in the college shall complete the equivalent of at least six credits in each of three of the four general education divisions (for a total of 18 credits): humanities, modes of reasoning, natural science, social science.

Bilingual/trilingual requirement*: for the bilingual iBA, students must complete at least 18 credits in each official language (English and French). At least 6 of these credits must be completed at Glendon from the following two categories:

  • French as a Second Language and/or in English as a Second Language at the 2000 level or above;
  • discipline courses which are designated as satisfying the bilingual requirement.

The remaining 12 credits in either official language may be completed abroad.

For the iBA trilingual, in addition to the above 18 credits in each official language (English and French), students must complete 18 credits in Hispanic studies (including: GL/SP 3000 6.00) or six credits of an advanced-level course in Hispanic studies) or 18 credits in a modern language (including an advanced-level course) at York University.

Internationally-oriented course requirement*: at least 12 credits of internationally-oriented courses.

Exchange requirement*: at least one full term abroad as a full-time student at an institution with which Glendon and/or York has a formal exchange agreement.

Upper-level credits*: at least 36 credits at the 3000 or 4000 level, including at least 18 credits at the 4000 level. This includes the 3000 and 4000 level credits in the major listed above (under major credits).

Credits outside the major*: at least 18 credits.

Residency requirement: a minimum of 30 credits at York and at least half (50 per cent) of the course credits required in each undergraduate degree program major/minor must be taken at Glendon.

Graduation requirement: students must successfully complete (pass) at least 120 credits which meet the Faculty's degree and program requirements with a cumulative grade point average of at least 5.00 (C+).

*Note: please refer to the Regulations for the Bachelor of Arts Degree section of the Undergraduate Calendar for detailed requirement information.

Honours Double Major BA

The Honours BA program described above may be pursued jointly with any other Honours BA degree program offered at Glendon. For further details on requirements, see the listings for specific Honours BA programs.

Honours Double Major iBA

The Honours iBA program described above may be pursued jointly with any other Honours iBA degree program offered at Glendon. For further details on requirements, see the listings for specific Honours iBA programs.

Honours Major/Minor BA

The Honours BA program described above may be pursued jointly with any Honours Minor BA program offered at Glendon. For further details on requirements, see the listings for specific Honours Minor programs.

Honours Major/Minor iBA

The Honours iBA program described above may be pursued jointly with any Honours Minor BA program offered at Glendon. For further details on requirements, see the listings for specific Honours Minor programs.

Honours Minor BA

The Honours Minor must be pursued jointly with any approved Honours BA or iBA program which offers a major/minor option at Glendon.

Minor credits: students must complete at least 30 credits including:

All MATH courses at the 1000 level must be taken by the end of the second year of study.

Bachelor of Arts: 90 Credits

Major credits: students must complete at least 48 credits (36 credits in Economics, 12 credits in Mathematics), including:

All MATH courses at the 1000 level must be taken by the end of the second year of study.

General education requirement*: every BA student in the college shall complete the equivalent of at least six credits in each of three of the four general education divisions (for a total of 18 credits): humanities, modes of reasoning, natural science, social science.

Bilingual requirement*: all students admitted to Glendon must satisfy the bilingual requirement. In order to do so, students must successfully complete six credits in each official language (French and English) at Glendon from the following two categories:

  1. courses at the second-year level and above in French as a Second Language and/or in English as a Second Language;
  2. courses in any discipline which are designated as satisfying the bilingual requirement.

Upper-level credits*: at least 18 credits at the 3000 or 4000 level. This includes the 3000 and 4000 level credits in the major listed above (under major credits).

Credits outside the major*: at least 18 credits.

Residency requirement: a minimum of 30 credits at York and at least half (50 per cent) of the course credits required in each undergraduate degree program major/minor must be taken at Glendon.

Graduation requirement: students must successfully complete (pass) at least 90 credits which meet the Faculty's degree and program requirements with a cumulative grade point average of at least 4.00 (C).

*Note: please refer to the Regulations for the Bachelor of Arts Degree section of the Undergraduate Calendar for detailed requirement information.

Course Substitutes

Subject to course exclusions, program requirements/restrictions and residency requirements, the following courses are acceptable substitutes for the purpose of meeting the Economics program requirements. All other course substitutes must be approved by the department chair.

Program Course Course Substitutes
GL/ECON 1000 3.00 AP/ECON 1000 3.00
GL/ECON 1010 3.00 AP/ECON 1010 3.00
GL/MATH 1930 3.00

AP/ECON 1530 3.00

SC/MATH 1300 3.00

SC/MATH 1550 6.00

GL/MATH 1940 3.00

AP/ECON 1540 3.00

SC/MATH 1550 6.00

  • Glendon College
  • Glendon is York's midtown bilingual campus. It is the only institution in southern Ontario where university programs are offered in both French and English. Glendon offers an ideal environment for pursuing undergraduate studies. Situated in a park-like setting, bordering the glen of the Don River Valley, the Glendon campus is an oasis of peace and beauty. With a small, close-knit community and an excellent student/teacher ratio Glendon students are extremely well-supported in the classroom and outside of their studies.

    Glendon is proud of its quality programs that prepare students for interesting careers in fields as diverse as business, commerce, finance, public administration, diplomacy, education, communications, translation, health care and the environment. Glendon offers 19 programs leading to a Bachelor of Arts degree, Bachelor of Science degree, and two professional programs (Bachelor of Education and Bachelor of Arts in Translation). In addition, Glendon is home to Masters degrees in Translation, Études françaises, and Public and International Affairs. Courses required for the BBA, MBA and law school programs are offered at Glendon.

    Glendon is set in an international and bilingual environment. Students, professors and staff hail from over 100 countries and value the opportunity to study, live and work in English and French – and other languages. Students build their language skills while earning their degree. Students at all levels in their second language are welcome, and all students will study in both languages in order to meet the bilingual requirement for graduation. Students can choose second language courses based upon their level of proficiency and their linguistic goals.The language skills students hone at Glendon provide a definite advantage in the workplace.

    Glendon offers students the best of both worlds: a small campus of 2,700 students in the heart of Toronto, Canada’s 3rd largest University. Glendon’s close-knit community and small class sizes allow for direct and ready access to professors, fellow students and support services. Glendon students have the opportunity to study abroad, in their third year of an Honours program, at French-Canadian universities or partner universities around the world. Glendon has negotiated formal exchange agreements with 17 partners. Glendon students may also participate in the York University exchange program, which include agreements with more than 250 institutions in countries such as Mexico, Sweden, Israel, Japan and Hong Kong. An extensive international exchange program, internships, mentorships, conferences and high-profile guest speakers offer students the chance to combine their studies with practical, real world experience.

    At Glendon, students may study part time or full time, primarily during the day. Students who are interested in education may coregister with the Faculty of Education to complete concurrent degrees in arts or science and education. Glendon houses the Faculty of Education of the University of Ottawa and students from the centre-south-west region may now be registered at the University of Ottawa and attend their Consecutive BEd program on the Glendon campus.

    Student life at Glendon is full of extracurricular activities organized by and for students on campus. These include such events as Theatre Glendon productions, the winter carnival, the musical ensemble, poetry nights, and much more. Students come from all parts of the world to benefit from Glendon’s academic excellence, reputation and bilingual culture, and in turn offer cultural richness and different viewpoints that have become a trademark of the Glendon experience.

  • Part-time Studies
  • Part-time studies may be convenient for students who wish to combine University work with employment or personal commitments. It may also provide a stepping stone to full-time studies for students who have been away from formal education for a few years and wish to reintegrate slowly into full-time studies.

    About 10 percent of Glendon students are pursuing their degrees on a part-time basis, taking from three to six credits per term. They enjoy the same privileges and freedoms as full-time students in terms of course choice, accessibility of resources and participation in campus life, and are subject to the same regulations.

  • Academic Standing Requirements for Visiting Students
  • Individuals who wish to enrol in undergraduate credit courses, but who do not intend to complete a degree or a certificate may be admitted to York as a visiting student. There are three categories of visiting students:

    1. those who hold an undergraduate degree (three-year bachelor’s degree minimum) from an accredited university/university-level institution;
    2. those who do not hold an undergraduate degree but wish to enrol in York courses to fulfill the academic, upgrading or professional development requirements of a professional designation;
    3. those who are currently attending another recognized university and wish to take York courses on a letter of permission issued by their home institution.

    Grade Point Average (GPA) Requirement

    Students in categories a) and b) whose overall cumulative grade point average (OCGPA) falls below 4.00 on at least 24 credits attempted will not be allowed to enrol in any subsequent session as visiting students. Students who are not permitted to re-enrol must apply for re-admission through the Admissions Office.

    Note: repeated course legislation does not apply to visiting students but only to academic degrees and certificates. Therefore, all courses attempted or taken will count in the OCGPA.

    Credit Limits

    Students in category b) who have maintained an OCGPA of 4.00 throughout their studies and who have completed 30 credits will not be allowed to enrol in subsequent sessions and must either reactivate to proceed as visiting students or may choose to apply for admission to a degree or certificate program.

    Principal: Donald Ipperciel, 220 Glendon Hall, 416-487-6727
    Associate Principal, Student Services: Pascal Arseneau, B108 York Hall, 416-487-6710
    Associate Principal, Academics: Ian Roberge, 220 Glendon Hall, 416-487-6727
    Associate Principal, Research & Graduate Studies: Christina Clark-Kazak, 215 Glendon Hall, 416-736-2100 ext 88106
    Director of Academic and Financial Services: Fiona Kay, C102 York Hall, 416-487-6715