General Certificate in Refugee and Migration Studies

Faculty of Environmental Studies

Collège universitaire Glendon

Location: 137 Health Nursing and Environmental Studies Building (HNES), Tel.: 416-736-5252
Interim Dean: R. de Costa
Associate Deans: M. J. Bunch, L. K. Fawcett
Undergraduate Program Director: G. S. Fraser
Professors: M. J. Bunch, I. Kapoor, L. Gilbert, R. Keil, A. Kusno, L. Molot, F. Montoya-Greenheck, P. E. Perkins, R. L. Salter, L. A. Sandberg, C. A. H. Sandilands, N. Sturgeon, P. A. Victor
University Professors Emeriti: G. A. P. Carrothers, F. J. Fletcher, W. C. Found, P. F. Wilkinson
Professors Emeriti: A. M. Armour, D. Barndt, G. P. Daly, G. Desfor, J. B. Ellis, B. Greer-Wootten, H. P. M. Homenuck, A. L. Murray, G. P. Penz, B. L. Rahder, R. D. Schwass, J. Seager, E. S. Spence, G. R. Wekerle
Associate Professors: M. D. F. P. Campbell, R. de Costa, J. Etcheverry, L. K. Fawcett, S. Flicker, H. Ford-Smith, J. Foster, G. S. Fraser, J. Haritaworn,  S. Kipfer, U. Lehrer, D. MacGregor, R. MacRae, P. R. Mulvihill, P. E. Perkins, J. Podur, R. A. Rogers, D. N. Scott, L. Taylor, G. W. Thiemann, P. C. Timmerman, M. Winfield, A. Zalik
Associate Professors Emeriti: F. Handy, B. L. Kettel, R. G. Macdonald, R. L. Peterson, B. M. Rutherford
Assistant Professors: S. Colla, C. E. Hoicka, M. Stiegman
Assistant Lecturer: L. Myers, L. Sotomayer, T. Warkentin

Faculty of Environmental Studies students may earn a General Certificate in Refugee and Migration Studies while, and in addition to, fulfilling the requirements for the BES program.

Students should apply to enter the certificate program at the beginning of their third year. Students admitted to the certificate program must submit a completed checklist for the General Certificate in Refugee Migration Studies to the education coordinator at the Centre for Refugee Studies (CRS), to ensure that all certificate requirements have been considered. Further information is available from the education coordinator, Centre for Refugee Studies, or the coordinator’s academically accredited designate.

Required courses:

A list of pre-approved environmental studies courses follows. Other relevant courses may be selected and submitted from the available courses. Students can discuss the applicability of other courses with the Centre for Refugee Studies Education Coordinator.

Environmental studies courses for the General Certificate in Refugee and Migration Studies:

Other requirements:

To be awarded the certificate, students must:

  • Students must also achieve a cumulative GPA of 5.0 or higher in the courses taken for the Certificate.
  • All students enrolled in the General Certificate Program must attend a minimum of 8 CRS seminar presentations over the course of their degree. Note: Any seminar in addition to the regular CRS seminars that are either hosted or co-sponsored by CRS can also count towards fulfilling this requirement.
  • Students are required to complete 15 hours volunteer participation in the Student Caucus and/or other CRS activities. Please see list of activities for suggestions.

Other courses are listed in the Faculties of Glendon and Liberal Arts and Professional Studies sections of the Undergraduate Calendar. For more information, please visit the Centre for Refugee Studies website at http://crs.info.yorku.ca/.

 

Exigence de résidence à l'échelle de l'Université

Au moins 30 crédits d’un programme à York et 50 % des crédits exigés dans la majeure et la mineure doivent être complétés à Glendon.

University-Wide Residency Requirement

A minimum of 30 course credits and at least half (50 per cent) of the course credits required in each undergraduate degree program major/minor must be taken at York University.

Exigences de diplôme à l'échelle de la faculté

Faculty-Wide Degree Requirements

Exigences de programme spécifique

 

Program-Specific Degree Requirements

 

  • General Information
  • Information for Continuing Students in a Grandparented Program

    Continuing students who are enrolled in the program and returning students will be permitted to complete their existing degree and program of study including Area of Concentration under the grand parenting rules.

    We have made recent changes to the BES program in 2016: a new Area of Concentration (Environmental Justice, Politics and Arts) was launched and two Area of Concentrations were retired (Environment and Culture, and Environmental Politics). As part of this change, we have grand-parenting provisions for students who entered into the program prior to FW 2017-2018 academic session.  Environment and Culture and Environmental Politics students can choose to either fulfill the obligations of the retired Area of Concentrations or opt for the new Area of Concentration (Environmental Justice, Politics and Arts). For either choice, students need to complete their program following the policy and regulations of the program they declare prior to Fall/Winter 2017-2018. This includes all degree requirements including general educations requirements, Area of Concentration requirements, out of faculty requirements, upper level requirements as well as free electives.

    The Faculty of Environmental Studies is committed to ensure minimum disruption to students through adherence to grand parenting principles. The grand parenting rules will be in effect until Fall 2020 with February 2021 convocation being the final date. Students who have not completed the requirements of their grand parented program by the end of Fall 2020 session will be required to follow the program new requirements. Accordingly, new students being admitted in Fall 2017-2018 session will follow new program requirements. At the course level, grand parenting rules will need to take into consideration course levels, course content and course substitutes. It is assume that, if necessary, discretion will be used in order to accommodate any students inadvertently disadvantaged by the rules implemented.

     

    Simultaneous Enrolment Guidelines

    The Faculty of Environmental Studies does not permit students to enrol in courses that are conflicting with each other. Students cannot enrol in two or more courses in the same term that are offered on the same day and time.

    Students who undertake such schedules should be advised that there will be no special arrangements and/or support by Course Directors. Course directors are under no obligation to grant extensions for assignments/exams and/or tests that conflict as a result of double course enrolment. Students are expected to be in class regularly, hand in assignments on time and write the exam/test on its scheduled time. A petition to undertake such schedules in which course conflicts occur or to seek accommodation for such conflicts will not be supported by the Faculty.

    Pathway to Success

    The Pathway to Success program is designed to support students' academic success through a series of prescribed workshops and seminars that complement the BES program. The aim is to provide assistance early in the student's academic career to help them succeed and enjoy the full benefits of completing their BES degree at York University.

    Students will be placed on the Pathway to Success program, if in their first year of study, their midterm marks in each course are below a grade of “‘C” or if they are a continuing student and their cumulative grade point average (CGPA) falls below “C” (4.00).

    Through this program, each student's approach to enhancing their academic skills will be individualized according to the student's needs for academic support. Some of the workshops and seminars prescribed may be taken through the University Learning Skills Services department and the Library. Students can contact the Student Success Coordinator at anntsir@yorku.ca  for more information and to learn more about the program. 

    Course Load

    Environmental Studies students are subject to the following course load constraints:

    Fall/Winter Session

    • Fall/Winter session (Sep.–Apr.): Students are advised to take no more than 30.00 credits (fifteen credits per term), or a maximum of 36.00 credits (eighteen credits per term) may be taken, subject to review by the Student Success Coordinator and approval of student's Program Checklist
    • Students with substantial academic difficulties and/or financial responsibilities and/or personal circumstances are advised to take fewer courses than indicated in a session.

    Summer Session

    • Summer session (May–Aug.): Maximum of 15.00 credits.
    • Students with substantial academic difficulties and/or financial responsibilities and/or personal circumstances are advised to take fewer courses than indicated in a session.

    Requirements for Directed Reading and Directed Study Courses

    Undergraduate Directed Reading and Directed Study courses are for BES students who wish to pursue intensive individual work with a particular FES Faculty member on a specific topic of study.

    Normally, this will be entertained only for a topic that is not offered as a lecture/seminar or special topics course in a particular academic session. Directed Reading and Directed Study courses are subject to the following guidelines:

    • Students may request enrolment in Directed Reading and/or Directed Study courses only after having completed four full course equivalents (24.00 credits) in FES
    • Normally, the maximum permissible number of Directed Reading and/or Directed Study courses included in a BES Honours program is three full- course equivalents (18.00 credits).
    • Normally, within the last five full-course equivalents (i.e. during their last year), students may take a maximum of two full-course equivalents (12.00 credits) of Directed Reading and/or Directed Study courses.
    • Normally, students may take a maximum of two full-course equivalents (12.00 credits) of Directed Reading and/or Directed Study courses with the same Faculty member as Course Director.
    • The student and Faculty member must agree, at the time of enrolment in the course, on a written description of the course, its objectives, its content, the expected learning outcome, the form and frequency of contact between the student and Faculty member, and the form of its evaluation. This description/contract must be submitted to the Office of Student and Academic Services for approval by the Undergraduate Program Director; the student and the Faculty member should each retain a copy.
  • Bachelor in Environmental Studies (BES) Program Vision Statement and Expected Learning Outcomes 
  • Vision Statement

    The Bachelor in Environmental Studies (BES) program provides a well-rounded, interdisciplinary education in various intellectual and practical fields relating to natural, built, and social environments. The program is designed to prepare students with the knowledge, critical understanding, and capacity to deal effectively and sensitively with complex environmental and social challenges arising at the local, regional,national and/or global scale.

    The BES program introduces students to understanding humans as part of multi-fold relationships with the natural world. Learning how we can make these relationships sustainable and the society that governs them more just are goals of our experiential education. Aware of the growing inter-dependencies of human and natural life in a globalized world,the Faculty of Environmental Studies (FES) believes that non-Western and Indigenous perspectives are essential to a fruitful discussion of environmental issues. To that end, Faculty members strive to include abroad range of perspectives in their course offerings.

    Program Structure

    BES offers three different degree programs:

    1. Specialized Honours program (120 credits)

    2. Honours program (120 credits)

    3. Bachelor’s program (90 credits)

    Each program is designed with a combination of core courses and three distinct academic and professional Areas of Concentration (AOCs):

    I. Environmental Politics, Justice and Arts

    II. Urban and Regional Environments:

    Analysis, Planning and Design

    III. Environmental Management:

    Policy, Resources and Conservation

    The AOCs reflect FES’ broad understanding of Environmental Studies. Their coherence is established by scholarly, professional, and pragmatic considerations. Students use the AOCs to help define their own path through the program.

    BES Honours and Specialzed Honours Degree: Expected Learning Outcomes

    The BES program is committed to preparing students to take action on critical environmental issues. Students are encouraged to explore alternatives, strategies, and action related to social and environmental change.  Upon completing this program students have an ability to:

    1. Critically think using interdisciplinary perspectives on key contemporary environmental issues
    2. Conduct analyses on environmental issues from many perspectives and use a range of established techniques to initiate and undertake critical evaluation and propose solutions 
    3. Communicate information, arguments, and analyses accurately and reliably, orally and in writing to a range of audiences on pressing environmental challenges
    4. Understand, analyze and engage with environmental topics, using a range of established techniques, and propose solutions especially within their identified Area of Concentration
    5. Work effectively and professionally with others including the ability to recognize the power dynamics in group settings and acknowledge and respect different ways of knowing and undertake independence in knowledge production

    BES Bachelor’s Degree: Expected Learning Outcomes

    The BES program is committed to preparing students to take action on critical environmental issues. Students are encouraged to explore alternatives, strategies, and action related to social and environmental change. Upon completing this program students have an ability to: Use critical and interdisciplinary perspectives on environmental issues

    1. Conduct analyses on environmental issues from many perspectives and evaluate the appropriateness of different approaches for solving problems using well established ideas and techniques
    2. Communicate information, arguments, and analyses accurately and reliably, orally and in writing to a range of audiences
    3. Understand, analyze and engage with environmental topics, using a range of established techniques, and propose solutions especially within their identified Area of Concentration
    4. Work effectively and professionally with others including the ability to recognize the power dynamics in group settings and acknowledge and respect different ways of knowing

    Progress through the BES Program

    The BES program offers a set of core foundation courses, one in each AOC, as well as elective courses relating to natural, built, or social environments. Faculty members come from a wide range of backgrounds including political science, ecology, planning, philosophy, sociology, geography, economics, education, architecture, and anthropology. All share a commitment to exploring the complex questions and solutions to the human and environmental challenges facing the world. This approach provides flexibility and choice allowing students to combine many areas of interest.

    In the first two years of the program, students take required courses that introduce them to the wide range of ideas in Environmental Studies while building critical academic and practical knowledge, including research, writing, analytical and communication skills. During the latter half of the first year, students begin to explore the AOCs within the BES program they will situate themselves within. In the second year, students take  three foundation courses.  In third year, students will declared their AoC.  A specific set of courses is associated with each AOC. The course selections within a given AOC are designed to give structure and focus to a student's program and learning outcomes. The AOC provides in-depth knowledge related to the focal topics.

    The majority of courses are selected on student’s individual preferences. The course selection process is supported by regular one-on-one consultation with the BES Student Success Coordinator.

    BES Degree: Faculty Commitments

    The Faculty of Environmental Studies commits to provide an intellectually challenging and safe environment for all students. Specific provisions include but are not limited to:

    1. A challenging theoretical and practical intellectual learning environment
    2. A wide range of courses covering the humanities, social sciences and environmental sciences
    3. Instructors with expertise in a wide range of fields
    4. One-on-one advising
    5. Opportunities to develop specific skills and in-depth learning
    6. An outlook that includes local and global, historical and contemporary, and philosophical and applied questions
    7. A commitment to environmental justice issues related to ability, age, class, gender, race and sexual orientation
    8. The knowledge and skills needed for Graduate studies and/or environmental careers (e.g. community arts, environmental education, urban planning, urban ecology, environmental policy, human/gender rights, international development policy, environmental conservation and environmental management, sustainable energy)

     

  • BES Certificate Programs
  • While working towards the completion of their BES degree, students may opt to pursue a certificate in addition to their degree program. Students can choose one or more from the five areas: geographic information systems and remote sensing (GIS), cultural and artistics practices (CAP), refugee and migration studies (GSRM), sustainable energy (SE) or urban ecologies (UE). In order to do so, students are required to complete a number of required and elective courses, in addition to completing other degree requirements. Contact the FES Office of Student and Academic Services, 137 HNES or the Student Success Coordinator for more information on applying to these certificate programs.

    Minimum Requirements for Multiple Certificates

    Students may acquire more than one certificate during the course of their studies provided that at least 18 credits in each certificate program are unique to the specific certificate.

    Residency Requirements

    York University's residency requirement for undergraduate certificate programs is 18 credits for certificate programs requiring up to 36 credits, and 50 per cent of the required credits for certificates comprising more than 36 credits. Normally, for undergraduate certificate programs requiring 18 credits or less, all credits are completed at York.

  • BES Placement Opportunities          
  • The placement course is offered every term throughout the year and is open to third-year students who meet the eligibility requirements.

    Placement Course Description:

    The Environmental Studies placement (hereinafter "placement") is an experiential education course designed to provide Honours Bachelor in Environmental Studies (BES) students or Certificate in Cultural and Artistic Practices for Environmental and Social Justice (CAP) students with the opportunity to apply their classroom learning in a workplace environment. Through these placement opportunities, students will gain confidence in field-related knowledge, general employability skills, and valuable work experience.  When requirements are fulfilled, eligible students will enrol for either three or six credits depending on the number of hours approved for the placement. To be eligible, students must meet the following criteria.

    BES Honours students:

    1.  Be enrolled in full-time studies and in their third year of study in the BES program;
    2.  Successfully completed between 60 and 90 credits (or will have completed 60 credits by April of their third year);
    3.  Achieved a minimum Overall Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) of a B (6.00);
    4. Enrolled and successfully completed ES/ENVS 4002 3.00 Professional development the environmental sector: Preparation for experiential work placement prior to enrolling in ES/ENVS 4001 3.00 or ES/ENVS 4001 6.00 Placement Course;
    5. Have an approved placement secured by the Course Director of ES/ENVS 4001 3.00 or ES/ENVS 4001 6.00

    CAP students:

    1. Have declared the CAP certificate;
    2. Have completed 6.0 credits of artistic practice;
    3. Take three workshops from the career centre:

               Résumé & Cover Letter Writing workshop

              Job Search Strategies that Work workshop

                Polish Your Interview Skills workshop

         4. Be in contact with the Course Director of ES/ENVS 4001 3.00 or 6.00;

         5. Have an approved placement secured by the Course Director of ES/ENVS 4001 3.00 or 6.00

    Students who enroll in approved placements may receive 3 or 6 credits towards their degree upon the successful completion of the placement. Approved placements require a minimum of 120 hours of work and are generally 8–12 weeks in duration (3 credits) or a minimum of 240 hours of work over 8–12 weeks (6 credits). Course/tuition fees will be subject to the student’s fee status and as approved by York University. Placements will be carried out each semester throughout the year.

    In order to receive academic credit, students must enrol and register online for the course, using the York Enrolment System, go out on a pre-approved placement and fulfill the deliverables of the course. Students will be graded on a pass/fail which will be recorded on the student's transcript; the grade will not be included in the calculation of the student's Grade Point Average.

    Students are able and encouraged to participate in paid placements. However, financial compensation is not guaranteed by York University and students should be aware that the majority of placement providers do not provide financial compensation. Students are also responsible for any incurred costs associated with the placement (e.g., licensing or travel) or any additional requirements (e.g., vaccinations). The Workplace Safety and Insurance Board has information on "unpaid trainees" which is relevant.

    Note: ES/ENVS 4001 3.00 or 6.00 and/or ES/4002 3.00 are not automatically counted as Area of Concentration courses, students who take these courses must receive approval by petition from the Undergraduate Program Director.

  • Academic Excellence
  • Unlike completing requirements for an Honours degree program which refers to degree requirements (credits/courses) receiving an academic honour refers to academic excellence. The Faculty recognizes the academic excellence of its students by means of the following honours which are recorded on a student's transcript.

    Scholarships and Merit Awards

    These include FES Awards and Scholarships, Merit Awards, Entrance Scholarships, Renewable Scholarships and In-Course Scholarships.

    Sessional Dean's Honour Roll

    The Dean's Honour Roll recognizes a student’s academic achievements in a given session based on the following criteria:

    • students taking 12 to 17 credits in a given session and who have attained a sessional grade point average of 8.00.
    • students taking 18 or more credits in a given session and who have attained a sessional grade point average of 7.50.

    Graduating Honours

    Students with high grade point averages are eligible for the following honours upon graduation from the Faculty:

    Specialized Honours BES Degree - 120 Credits

    • Summa cum laude: cumulative grade point average 8.00+
    • Magna cum laude: cumulative grade point average 7.80 to 7.99
    • Cum laude: cumulative grade point average 7.50 to 7.79
    • Member of the Dean's Graduating Honour Roll: cumulative grade point average 7.00+
    • Dean's Sessional Honour Roll: 8.00 sessional cumulative grade point average on 12 to 17 credits or 7.50 sessional cumulative grade point average on 18 or more credits.

    BES Degree - 90 Credits

    • With Distinction: cumulative grade point average 8.00+
    • With Merit: cumulative grade point average 7.50 to 7.99
    • Member of the Dean's Graduating Honour Roll: cumulative grade point average 7.00 to 7.49
    • Dean's Sessional Honour Roll: 8.00 sessional cumulative grade point average on 12 to 17 credits or 7.50 sessional cumulative grade point average on 18 or more credits.
  • Policy on Student Term Work, Test and Examinations
  • All written or visual work that is submitted as part of an academic program must be submitted in hardcopy (not electronically), unless previously agreed to by the instructor or adviser.

    Please note that the aforemention policy statement outlines the required format for submission of student work for a course and/or an academic program, as outlined in BES course syllabi.

    BES Term Work, Tests and Examinations

    Term work:

    Term work includes reports, assignments, essays, tests, and other written and oral work assigned in a course, with the exception of final examinations, as outlined in the approved course syllabus. Course directors set the deadlines for submission of term work. All term work must be submitted by the last day of classes of the term in which the course ends. Term work submitted after the last day of classes of the term in which the course ends will not be accepted for grading. Notwithstanding that term work will not be accepted after the last day of classes of the term in which the course ends, assignments received later than the due date will be penalized five per cent of the value of the assignment per day that their assignments are late. Exceptions to the lateness policy for valid reasons such as illness, compassionate grounds etc. will be entertained by the course director only when supported by written documentation (e.g. a doctor's letter).

    Ethical Review of Undergraduate Course Research Involving Human Participants: FES Procedures

    York students are subject to the York University Policy for the ethics review process for research involving human participants. All research activity with human participants and minimal risk as part of this course has to undergo ethical review. Please consider the following definitions:

    1. Human participants in research will be defined as persons who provide data or information to the researcher which are typically not part of their professional capacity.
    2. The draft definition of funded research from the Human Participants Review Sub-Committee [HPRC] is: “‘Funded’ will refer to all research that is receiving money that is in response to a specific proposal and administered by the university. Research using monies not administered by the University, and/or not in response to a specific proposal, will be considered ‘unfunded’.”
    3. The definition of minimal risk being used is the one given in the SSHRC/NSERC/MRC Tri-Council Policy Statement on Ethical Conduct for Research involving Humans (August, 1998): “If potential subjects can reasonably be expected to regard the probability and magnitude of possible harms implied by participation in the research to be no greater than those encountered by the subject in those aspects of his or her everyday life that relate to the research, then the research can be regarded as within the range of minimal risk.”

    Examinations:

    Examinations may be held in any BES course in such form and manner as decided by the course director and as described in the approved course syllabus. Examinations are an essential part of the learning and evaluation process. They must be conducted under fair conditions which allow students to analyze, synthesize, and demonstrate what they have learned. Disruptions or attempts to obtain an unfair advantage are offences against due academic processes and carry severe penalties.

    End of term restrictions:

    The total value of any test(s) or examination(s) given during the last two weeks of classes in a term must carry a combined weighting of no more than 20 per cent of the final mark for the course. Note: exceptions are made for some third- and fourth-year courses, such as seminars that often have one or two major assignments due at the end of the term.

    Scheduling of tests:

    Except where testing is conducted during individual appointments which accommodate a student's schedule (e.g. individually scheduled make-up tests), tests or examinations given during the term must be held within the hours regularly scheduled for the course in question.

    Students' rights of refusal:

    Students who are asked to write tests or examinations in contravention of the preceding two regulations may refuse to do so without academic penalty. They also have the right to raise the matter with the undergraduate program director.

    General Regulations for Tests and Examinations

    Identification:

    Students who are being tested or examined are required to present their YU-card and/or an acceptable form of photographic identification when asked to do so by an instructor or invigilator. Acceptable forms of photographic identification include a valid driver's license with photograph attached, a valid passport or other certificate of citizenship with photograph attached.

    Formally Scheduled Examinations

    Final examination period:

    There is a final examination period at the end of each term, as published on the Registrar's Office website (http://www.registrar.yorku.ca/enrol/dates/).

    Examination schedules:

    The dates, times and places of formally scheduled examinations are published each term on the York Courses website (https://w2prod.sis.yorku.ca/Apps/WebObjects/cdm.woa/wa/curexam). Examinations may last two or three hours. Students are responsible for making themselves aware of the appropriate examination details.

    Missed examinations:

    A student who misses an examination must contact the Office of Student and Academic Services or the course director or the Registrar's Office within 48 hours of the examination. A student who wishes to write a make-up examination must petition for deferred standing in the course.

    Supplemental examinations or rewriting of examinations:

    These are not allowed in the Faculty of Environmental Studies. Once the final examination has been written or the major paper submitted, the course is considered to be completed. Examinations or papers cannot be rewritten to improve a final grade. There shall be no rewriting to improve a mark.

    Assessment of Students in BES Courses

    The course director shall assess students enrolled in each BES course in light of the requirements set at the beginning of the course as articulated in the course syllabus. These assessments shall be based on a combination of tests or formal examination(s), participation in classes, term work submitted, and other evidence as determined by the course director.

  • Grading in Courses, Deferred Standing
  • The Faculty of Environmental Studies follows the York University undergraduate grading scheme which awards letters ranging from A+ to F and assigns a point value from 0 to 9 to each letter grade. Where percentages are used as a means of reporting grades on individual pieces of work, the following conversion table is to be used in converting percentage grades to letter grades, unless alternative provisions for scaling and/or conversion are announced to students in writing within the first two weeks of classes.

    Grade

    Grade Point Value

    Percent

    Definition

    A+

    9

    90

    Exceptional: thorough knowledge of concepts and/or techniques and exceptional skill or great originality in their use

    A

    8

    80–89

    Excellent: Thorough knowledge of concepts and/or techniques and a high degree of skill and/or some elements of originality

    B+

    7

    75–79

    Very Good: Thorough knowledge of concepts and/or techniques and a fairly high degree of skill in their use

    B

    6

    70–74

    Good: Good level of knowledge of concepts and/or techniques and considerable skill in their use

    C+

    5

    65–69

    Competent: Acceptable level of knowledge of concepts and/or techniques and reasonable skill in their use

    C

    4

    60–64

    Fairly Competent: Acceptable level of knowledge of concepts and/or techniques and some ability in their use

    D+

    3

    55–59

    Passing: Slightly better than minimal knowledge of concepts and/or techniques and some ability in their use

    D

    2

    50–54

    Barely Passing: Minimum knowledge of concepts and/or techniques needed to satisfy course requirements

    E

    1

    40–49

    Marginally failing

    F

    0

    0–39%

    Failing

     

    Marking Scheme

    Announcement in class:

    The means of determining the final grade in a course shall be provided to students by the course director. Such information must include the types of assignments, essays, examinations, and other components, which make up the grade, their relative weight(s), and any other procedures, which enter into the determination of the final grade.

    Subsequent changes:

    In exceptional circumstances, a previously announced marking scheme for a course may be changed, but only with the consent of all students and the approval of the undergraduate program director. The course director must distribute the new marking scheme in written form to the students.

    Feedback during course:

    Course directors are obliged to provide a mechanism by which students can be apprised of their progress in a course and that the grading scheme (i.e. kinds and weights or assignments, essays, exams etc.) be announced, and be available in writing, within the first two weeks of class, and that, under normal circumstances, graded feedback worth at least 15 per cent of the final grade for fall, winter or summer term, and 30 per cent for “full year” courses offered in the fall/winter term be received by students in all courses prior to the final withdrawal date from a course without receiving a grade, with the following exceptions:

    • graduate or upper-level undergraduate courses where course work typically or at the instructor's discretion, consists of a single piece of work and/or is based predominantly (or solely) on student presentations (e.g. honours theses or graduate research papers not due by the drop date etc.);
    • practicum courses;
    • ungraded courses;
    • courses in Faculties where the drop date occurs within the first three weeks of classes;
    • courses which run on a compressed schedule (a course which accomplishes its academic credits of work at a rate of more than one credit hour per two calendar weeks).

    Note: under unusual and/or unforeseeable circumstances which disrupt the academic norm, course directors are expected to provide grading schemes and academic feedback in the spirit of these regulations, as soon as possible.

    Alternate Grading Method

    Pass/Fail

    Students in the Faculty of Environmental Studies can request a pass/fail option only after completing 24 credits. Courses taken under the pass/fail option will be annotated on their transcript as P (pass) or F (fail). Neither of these grades will be calculated into their grade point average. The following rules apply to the pass/fail option:

    • only students who have good academic standing may choose this option (i.e. above 4.00 (C) or 5.00 (C+) grade point average, depending on degree program);
    • students are required to have completed 24 credits towards an undergraduate degree program before requesting this option;
    • courses taken under this option may not be used to satisfy major or minor (including for-credit practica), outside-the-major required courses, courses taken to satisfy general education or certificate requirements, or required 1000-level science courses for students in the Faculties of Health and Science;
    • students in the Honours BES program can take a maximum of 12 credits on the pass/fail option;
    • students in the 90-credit BES program may take a maximum of six credits on the pass/fail option;
    • students who intend to take a course on the pass/fail option must confirm their eligibility to complete a course on an ungraded basis;
    • students must request to do so within the first two weeks of classes in the term in which the course is being offered;
    • students are required to complete a pass/fail application form and submit to the relevant offices – the form is available online at the Pass/Fail Option website (http://www.registrar.yorku.ca/enrol/passfail). The student will return the completed form with the course director's approval to the Faculty of Environmental Studies, Office of Student and Academic Services, 137 HNES;
    • students who select the pass/fail grading option can switch back to a graded option without academic penalties until the last day to drop the course.

    The above items do not apply to graduate degree or diploma programs, the BEd and BEd (Technological Education) degree programs of the Faculty of Education or the JD degree program of the Osgoode Hall Law School or exchange courses taken at another institution.

    Repeated Passed or Failed Courses

    Students may repeat a passed or failed course twice for academic degree or certificate credit, for a maximum of three (3) attempts at a course. Students should note that course availability and space considerations may preclude the possibility of repeating a course in the session they choose.

    Credit towards your degree will only be counted once for repeated courses taken at York or elsewhere. All repeated passed or failed attempts are subject to the University "Policy on Repeating Passed or Failed Courses For Academic Credit".

    Grade Reappraisals

    Reappraisal of Final BES Course Grades

    Students may, with sufficient academic grounds, request that a final grade in a course be reappraised (which may mean the review of specific pieces of tangible work). Non-academic grounds are not relevant for grade reappraisals; in such cases, students are advised to petition to their home Faculty. Students are normally expected to first contact the course director to discuss the grade received and to request that their tangible work be reviewed. Tangible work may include written, graphic, digitized, modeled, video recording or audio recording formats, but not oral work.

    Students need to be aware that a request for a grade reappraisal may result in the original grade being raised, lowered or confirmed.

    In the event that students are still not satisfied with the final grade or the course director is not available to review the work, they may submit in writing a formal request for a grade reappraisal to the department or unit in which the course is offered*. The Senate approved deadline for submitting grade reappraisals is within three weeks of the release of final grade reports in any term. Exercising discretion about minor delays in meeting the deadline which result from slow mail delivery or extraordinary circumstances is reasonable.

    *The exceptions are as follows:

    • For courses offered by Osgoode Hall Law School, Schulich School of Business and the Faculty of Education, the requests for reappraisal are submitted to the office of the relevant associate dean.
    • If the condition of sufficient academic grounds has been met, the relevant department committee, department Chair, associate dean or graduate/undergraduate program director will be responsible for ensuring that the work is reappraised by an appropriate faculty member, ensuring anonymity of both the student and the reappraiser and for communicating the result of the reappraisal (including the reappraiser’s comments) and the route of appeal to both the student and the course director. The reappraiser will be given the nature of the assignment and the rationale for the original grade. It is expected that every effort will be made to render the decision within 30 days of the reviewer having received the work.

    Date by Which to Request a Grade Reappraisal

    Requests for grade reappraisals must be submitted by the scheduled date for the term in which a course is completed and the grade released.

    Winter term - June 15

    Summer term - September 30

    Fall term - February 15

    In all cases, a minimum of 21 days from the date of the release of grades will be allowed. Whenever the grade reappraisal reflects a grade change it will be annotated on the student's transcript.

    Further Appeal for Reappraisal of a Final BES Course Grade

    If the student is not satisfied with a reappraised final course grade, the procedure shall be as follows:

    • the course director and the student shall discuss the matter with the undergraduate program director, who may or may not arrange another reappraisal;
    • if the matter remains unresolved, the student may appeal the grade by petition on the appropriate form provided by the Office of Student and Academic Services to the Undergraduate Program Review and Admissions Subcommittee, clearly stating the grounds for appeal;
    • the decision of the Undergraduate Program Review and Admissions Subcommittee shall be final, and may be appealed to the FES Appeals Committee only on grounds of procedural irregularity.

    Reappraisal of Grades Other Than Final Course Grades

    If a student is not satisfied with any grade—other than a final course grade—received from an instructor or teaching assistant, the student is expected to discuss the matter (and at such time may request a reappraisal) with the person from whom the student received the grade, normally within two weeks. A reappraisal may result in a lower, higher or unchanged grade. If the student is not satisfied with the result of the reappraisal, the instructor or teaching assistant (where appropriate) shall discuss the matter with the course director. The course director shall decide whether or not to reappraise the student’s work and the decision is final for all grades other than final course grades.

    Deferred Standing

    In some cases, students may be eligible for deferred standing (an extension) allowing additional time to write a test or final examination or to complete an assignment after the University's deadline for submission of term work. Senate policy states that students must request deferred standing through the department responsible for the course within one week following a missed examination or the last day to submit course work.

    Students are responsible for ensuring that full documentation (medical or other) is provided in support of a petition for deferred standing. Application forms are available online at the Deferred Standing Web page (http://www.registrar.yorku.ca/exams/deferred).

    Aegrotat Standing

    In cases where a student cannot be expected to complete the work for a course, the phrase “aegrotat standing” (from the Latin for "she/he is ill") is substituted for a grade on the transcript. Aegrotat standing is seldom granted, and only in exceptional circumstances where deferred standing is inappropriate. For more information, please contact your course director.

  • Academic Warnings and  Penalties
  • Students whose academic record does not meet Faculty standards are subject to the academic penalties of academic warning, required withdrawal, debarment warning, debarment and academic probation.

    Academic Warning

    Students whose overall cumulative grade point average falls below 4.00 (C) at the end of any session or who enter the Faculty with a grade point average equivalent to less than 4.00 (C) on the York University undergraduate grading scheme, receive an academic warning. Students who receive an academic warning must achieve an overall cumulative grade point average of at least 4.00 (C) within the next 24 credits taken or must earn a sessional grade point average of at least 5.00 (C+) in the session in which the 24th credit is completed and in each subsequent session until the cumulative average reaches 4.00 (C) or be required to withdraw.

    Required Withdrawal

    Students whose academic record show marked weaknesses may be required to withdraw from their studies for one year, during which time they are encouraged to identify and remedy any problems which may have contributed to their failure to perform up to their potential, and to reflect on their reasons for pursuing a university education. The following regulations apply to required withdrawals:

    Grade Point Average Below 3.00 (D+)

    Students whose cumulative grade point average on at least 24 credits is below 3.00 must withdraw for 12 months.

    Grade Point Average Below 4.00 (C) and Greater than 3.00 (D+)

    Students who have received an academic warning for a cumulative grade point average below 4.00 (C) must achieve a cumulative grade point average of at least 4.00 (C) within their next 24 credits taken or earn a sessional grade point average of at least 5.00 (C+) in the session in which the 24th credit is completed and in each subsequent session until the cumulative average reaches 4.00 (C); otherwise, they must withdraw for 12 months. Should the student’s cumulative grade point average fall below 3.00 (D+) at any time after completion of 24 credits, they will be required to withdraw.

    Petition to Continue Without Interruption

    Students who have been required to withdraw may submit a petition to the Faculty of Environmental Studies Undergraduate Academic Review and Admission Sub-Committee requesting permission to continue their studies without interruption. For further information, contact the Office of Student and Academic Services, 137 HNES.

    Reactivation after Required Withdrawal

    Students who have been required to withdraw may apply for reactivation (to continue their studies) after the requisite period of absence by submitting a request online at the Reactivation Web page (http://www.registrar.yorku.ca/enrol/reactivate/index.htm). Students who return to their studies after such a required withdrawal (as well as those who have been allowed to continue their studies by virtue of a petition to the FES Petitions Committee) will receive a debarment warning.

    Debarment Warning

    Students who have been required to withdraw from the Faculty of Environmental Studies or from another Faculty at York or elsewhere receive will a debarment warning upon returning or continuing their studies in the Faculty of Environmental Studies. Students on a debarment warning must achieve a cumulative grade point average of at least 4.00 (C) within the next 24 credits taken or earn a sessional grade point average of at least 5.00 (C+) in the session in which the 24th credit is completed and in each subsequent session until their cumulative average reaches 4.00 (C), and must then maintain this average. Students who do not fulfill these conditions will be debarred from the University. Students whose cumulative grade point average falls below 3.00 (D+) at any time while on a debarment warning will be debarred.

    Debarment

    Students who have already been required to withdraw because of their unsatisfactory academic record and whose record does not show improvement will be debarred from the University. Debarment, the minimum period for which is normally two years, means that a student is no longer a student at York University.

    Petition to Continue Without Interruption

    Students who have been debarred may submit a petition to the Faculty of Environmental Studies Petitions Committee requesting permission to continue their studies without interruption. For further information, contact the Office of Student and Academic Services, 137 HNES.

    Reapplying After Debarment

    Students who have been debarred and who wish to resume their studies must apply for admission through the Admissions Office and must provide persuasive evidence that they are ready and able to complete a degree program.

    Academic Probation

    Students who have been debarred and who subsequently resume their studies in the Faculty of Environmental Studies – by petitioning to continue without interruption or by reapplying for admission - receive an academic probation. The conditions for continuing on an academic probation are the same as those for a debarment warning.

    Breach of Academic Honesty

    Conduct that violates the ethical or legal standards of the University community is a serious matter. In particular, any breach of academic honesty is a most serious offence to both the University community and the academic enterprise. Therefore, all faculty members are required to treat any breach of academic honesty, no matter how small the breach may appear, as a most serious matter demanding most thorough investigation. The rules embodied in the University Senate Policy on Academic Honesty and the Procedures Governing Breach of Academic Honesty apply to all BES students and are described in the University Policies section of this publication.

    In the Faculty of Environmental Studies it is a serious offence against academic honesty, among other things, to cheat, to impersonate, to plagiarize or misappropriate the work of others, to practice improper research procedures, to be dishonest in publication, to aid and abet academic misconduct or to undertake any other action that runs counter to academic honesty. In addition, some forms of breach of academic honesty might constitute offences under the Criminal Code of Canada. While the pressures of school may be such that a student may feel pressured to breach academic honesty, students must completely resist such pressures. Students who are unsure of what may constitute a breach of academic honesty should consult with the Senate Policy on Academic Honesty (in the University Policies and Regulations section) or with the Faculty of Environmental Studies Office of Student and Academic Services.

  • Academic Standing
  • Academic standing depends on several factors, including the number of courses a student has passed, the grade point average achieved during a particular session (sessional grade point average) and the overall grade point average (cumulative grade point average).

    Honours BES Degree

    Qualifying for Honours: Students with no Previous Postsecondary Education

    Students who are admitted to the Faculty of Environmental Studies with no prior experience at a postsecondary educational institution (such as a university or college) are automatically enrolled in an Honours program.

    Transfer Students

    Students who are admitted to the Faculty of Environmental Studies with prior experience at a postsecondary educational institution are required to enrol in the Honours program if their prior cumulative grade point average (including failed courses) is at least the equivalent of 5.00 (C+) on the York scale.

    Note: courses taken at other postsecondary institutions are not calculated as part of the student’s grade point average at York, nor do they appear on the York University transcript.

    Continuing and Revisions to Progression Requirements: Honours Standing

    To continue in an Honours program, students must maintain a minimum cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of at least 5.00 (C+). Students whose cumulative grade point averages fall below 5.00 (C+) during the course of their studies may proceed in an Honours program, on warning, provided that they meet the year level progression requirements as set out below.

    Year Level Credit Range CGPA
    1 0 to 23 4.00
    2 24 to 53 4.25
    3 54 to 83 4.80
    4 84 to 120 5.00

    Students must successfully complete (pass) at least 120 credits, meet Faculty and program requirements, and achieve a CGPA of 5.00 (C+) for all courses taken to satisfy their program in order to graduate with an Honours degree. Students who are permitted to continue in an Honours program on warning will be required to attend an advising appointment with their adviser.

    Ineligibility to Continue in Honours

    Students who do not meet the conditions outlined above may continue their studies only in the Bachelor’s 90 credit degree program. Students will be automatically transferred to the Bachelor’s program.

    Graduating in Honours

    To graduate from an Honours program, students must successfully complete (pass) at least 120 credits which meet the Faculty of Environmental Studies' program requirements. The cumulative grade point average for all courses taken must be at least 5.00 (C+).

    Courses Taken Beyond the Normal Maximum

    Students in an Honours BES program who successfully complete more than 120 credits and whose cumulative grade point average is at least 5.00 (C+) will have all credits counted towards their Honours BES and their cumulative grade point average.

    Opting to Graduate in the BES Program – 90 credit

    Students registered in the 120-credit Honours program may opt to graduate with a 90-credit degree if they fulfill those program requirements. Students who wish to take advantage of this option should complete the relevant online application form on the York Convocation website http://www.yorku.ca/mygrad/preparing/apply/ by early December for graduation the following spring or by mid-August for graduation the following fall (refer to the 90-credit program requirements).

    Students registered in an Honours BES program whose cumulative grade point average after completion of 90 credits falls below 5.00 (C+), but remains 4.00 (C) or above, may request to graduate with a 90-credit BES degree if they fulfill the degree requirements or may continue in the program until the requirements for the 90-credit degree are fulfilled. They may not continue in an Honours program and they may not take extra courses in a subsequent session in an effort to raise their cumulative grade point average to re-enter the Honours program.

    Re-entering Honours

    Students who are ineligible to continue in the Honours program because their cumulative grade point average has fallen below the minimum requirement as outlined above may re-enter the Honours BES program only if they raise their cumulative grade point average to 5.00 (C+) or above by the time they have successfully completed their 90th credit.

    BES Degree

    Students must successfully complete (pass) courses for at least 90 credits which meet the bachelor of environmental studies program requirements. The cumulative grade point average for all courses taken must be at least 4.00 (C).

    Courses Taken Beyond the Normal Maximum - in Order to Raise Cumulative Grade Point Average

    Students in the BES program who have passed 90 credits in accordance with the Faculty of Environmental Studies program requirements, but whose cumulative grade point average is below 4.00 (C), may attempt to raise their average to 4.00 (C) by taking up to 12 additional credits, to a maximum of 102 credits. These courses must be above the 1000 level and a minimum of six credits must be taken in FES; regulations on equivalent and excluded courses apply.

    Courses Taken Beyond the Normal Maximum

    Students in the BES program who successfully complete more than 90 credits and whose cumulative grade point average is at least 4.00 (C) and less than 5.00 (C+) will have all credits counted towards their BES degree and their cumulative grade point average.

    Transferring to Honours

    Students in the BES 90-credit program who become eligible for the Honours program due to a higher grade point average, will automatically be transferred to the Honours BES degree program. Students who have graduated from the Faculty of Environmental Studies with a 90-credit BES degree and whose record makes them eligible for an Honours BES may apply to the Faculty to pursue the Honours degree.

    Academic Standing Requirements for Visiting Students

    Individuals who wish to enrol in undergraduate credit courses, but who do not intend to complete a degree or a certificate may be admitted to York as a visiting student (see the Admissions section for more information). There are three categories of visiting students:

    1. those who hold an undergraduate degree (three-year bachelor's degree minimum) from an accredited university/university-level institution;
    2. those who do not hold an undergraduate degree but wish to enrol in York courses to fulfill the academic, upgrading or professional development requirements of a professional designation;
    3. those who are currently attending another recognized university and wish to take York courses on a letter of permission issued by their home institution.

    Grade Point Average (GPA) Requirement

    Students in categories A and B whose overall cumulative grade point average (OCGPA) falls below 4.00 (C) based on a minimum of 24 credits will not be allowed to enrol in any subsequent session as visiting students. Students who are not permitted to re-enrol must apply for re-admission through the Admissions Office.

    Note: repeated course legislation does not apply to visiting students but only to academic degrees and certificates. Therefore, all courses attempted or taken will count in the OCGPA.

    Credit Limits

    Students in category B who have maintained an OCGPA of 4.00 (C) or higher throughout their studies and who have completed 30 credits will not be allowed to enrol in subsequent sessions and must either reactivate to proceed as visiting students or may choose to apply for admission to a degree or certificate program. This pause allows students in category B an opportunity to reconsider options to apply to degree studies given the transfer credit implications.

     

  • Academic Advising and the BES Program Checklist
  • There are several group advising sessions hosted by the Bachelor in Environmental Studies (BES) Student Success Coordinator that are held in February and March. It is mandatory that BES students attend one of these sessions as we want to ensure that students are fully aware of program options and are provided an opportunity to discuss program objectives and future course selections. These meetings also provide information on  how to complete a program checklist which  is an extremely important  tool used by students to track their degree progress and to  ensure they meet their BES degree requirements including their declared area of concentration. Each student is required to complete a BES program checklist in full on a yearly basis and submit it to the BES Student Success Coordinator by the end of April.

    In addition to  the mandatory group advising session, students who need additional assistance can schedule individual appointments with the Student Success Coordinator. Failure to submit a properly completed program checklist for approval may result in a delay in course registration for the following fall/winter session. It may also prohibit students from enrolling in their desired or required courses.

    We want you to graduate in a timely manner. Therefore, in the final year of study, students need to:

    I.             attend the mandatory group advising session

    II.           complete the BES Program Checklist

    III.          book an individual appointment with the BES Student Success Coordinator and

    IV.          complete the program checklist in full, prior to the individual appointment with the BES Student Success Coordinator

    Advising appointments can be made through the Student Success Coordinator, room 134 HNES, by phone at 416-736-2100 ext. 33510, or by email at anntsir@yorku.ca. Students who fail to attend a group advising appointment and do not submit a completed BES program checklist will be blocked from enrolment and registration.