Urban Studies

Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies

Collège universitaire Glendon

Department of Social Science

Location: S775 Ross Building, Tel.: 416-736-5054, ext. 77796
Website: http://urst.sosc.laps.yorku.ca/
Program Coordinators: L. Drummond, Social Science; D. Young, Social Science
Affiliated Faculty: T. Abbruzzese, Social Science; R. Basu, Geography; L. Code, Geography/Social Science; L. Drummond, Social Science; G. Fallis, Economics/Social Science; L. Gilbert, Environmental Studies; S. Hornstein, Visual Arts/Fine Arts; W. Jenkins, Geography; M. J. Keall, Social Science; R. Keil, Environmental Studies; S. Kipfer, Environmental Studies; L. Lo, Geography; L. Peake, Social Science; V. Preston, Geography; B. Rahder, Environmental Studies; M. Stein, History; G. Wekerle, Environmental Studies; D. Young, Social Science

The city is among the most fundamental of human institutions. Across history, cities have been sites of basic innovation in economic, political and cultural life — centres of trade, seats of empire and the locale of scientific, social and artistic creativity. Cities retain these roles today and are the home of a growing majority of the world’s population who increasingly live in large metropolitan regions of several million people. Often, as in many Canadian cities, these urban regions are marked by complex social diversity, striking contrasts of wealth and poverty, and a challenging array of planning and environmental dilemmas.

These several themes are the focus of York’s Urban Studies program which offers a framework for an undergraduate liberal-arts education based in the study of modern metropolitan life and the social and spatial fabrics of cities. The program is interdisciplinary, drawing on the work of scholars and researchers who have viewed the urban field from a range of perspectives in the social sciences and humanities. Its courses encourage a critical appreciation of the everyday life that we experience as Canadian city-dwellers and of the modern city in historical and comparative context, and they seek to explore future challenges that may confront city-building and urbanism. Many courses also stress field studies in the streets and neighbourhoods of Toronto.

The program provides a good foundation for graduate study in such fields as urban planning, community development, municipal affairs or international development, or for careers in such areas as education or journalism. Many program alumni now work as planners, policy advisers, researchers and research consultants, teachers, real estate entrepreneurs, government or corporate administrators, social workers, lawyers or in other professions for which their undergraduate studies served as a springboard. Students may explore these possibilities in the program’s 4000-level work-placement course.

Exigence de résidence à l'échelle de l'Université

Au moins 30 crédits d’un programme à York et 50 % des crédits exigés dans la majeure et la mineure doivent être complétés à Glendon.

University-Wide Residency Requirement

A minimum of 30 course credits and at least half (50 per cent) of the course credits required in each undergraduate degree program major/minor must be taken at York University.

Exigences de diplôme à l'échelle de la faculté

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Faculty-Wide Degree Requirements

General Education

The Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies general education curriculum provides students with the foundation of interdisciplinary knowledge, breadth, methods and the approaches necessary for successful liberal and professional education. General education courses approved for credit expose students to ways of knowing and fundamental ideas spanning the humanities, natural science and social science. These courses also provide explicit instruction in critical analytical skills and thought and its communication in writing and speech.

Students take a minimum of 21 general education credits as follows:

  • 6 credits in natural science (NATS)
  • 9.00 credit course in either the humanities or social science categories from the approved list of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies general education courses
  • 6.00 credit course on the other side of the humanities and social science category divide from the approved list of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies general education courses

Guidelines for General Education Courses

All LA&PS students will be required to take a minimum of 21 general education credits from the approved list of LA&PS general education courses.

It is strongly recommended that students successfully complete (pass) their first general education course within the first 24 credits and all general education courses within the first 48 credits.

All general education courses are offered at the 1000 level.

All approved general education courses may count for general education credits; some may count for major credits; none may count as both.

A maximum of 36 credits in general education will count towards the degree. Students who are required to exceed the 36 credit maximum because of program/degree requirements must obtain permission.

General education courses may be offered by any school or department in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies. Please refer to the listing of approved general education courses for liberal arts & professional studies.

Note: All approved LA&PS general education courses will be added to the university repository with the following language added to their course descriptions “Note: This course has been approved in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies for general education credit.”

Major Credits

In addition to taking courses which contribute to their broad knowledge, students are required to specialize in a specific subject or combination of subjects. The area of primary concentration is known as the major; an area of secondary concentration (if any) is known as the minor. In a double major program, a course may count for major credit towards only one major. In a major/minor program, a course may count only for major credit or for minor credit.

Students may choose to major or minor in a specific subject when they enter the University or they may wait until they have completed up to 24 credits. At this point, students must choose a major and possibly a minor, but subsequent changes are possible. In selecting courses, students who are undecided should try to take introductory courses in a number of potential major subjects. This will allow them to proceed in their subject(s) of choice without the possibility of a delay.

Cross-listed courses may not be double counted in order to fulfill major requirements. For example, if AP/SOCI 3030 6.00 is cross-listed to AP/POLS 3300 6.00, it may be counted as a sociology course or a political science course, but not as both.

Upper-level Credits

The Faculty also considers it good educational practice to ensure that students take a number of credits at the 3000 level and/or 4000 level. (A course's level is indicated by the first digit of its number.)

Credits Outside the Major

Credits outside the major are courses which are intended to broaden the educational experience of students beyond their area of specialization. Credits outside the major include most courses which are not used to fulfill the general education requirements or major/minor requirements. Please refer to programs of study section for program specific information.

Courses which are not considered as fulfilling the credits outside the major requirement:

  • major/minor courses taken above the required number, non-major/minor courses taken within the major/minor subject (e.g. AP/FR 1020 6.00 is a non-major French course);
  • courses outside the major/minor taken to fulfill major/minor requirements;
  • courses which are cross-listed or designated as course substitutes to courses offered by the major/minor program (e.g. SC/MATH 1530 3.00 is cross-listed to AP/ECON 1530 3.00);
  • cross-listed courses used to fulfill the major requirements may not also be used to fulfill the outside the major credits requirement.

Minimum Requirements by Program Type

The following minimum requirements apply to all Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies students. Each program of study (major or minor) may stipulate additional requirements. For details of individual programs, refer to the Programs of Study section. Also consult the section on Academic Standing.

In order to graduate with an Honours BA degree, students must achieve satisfactory academic standing to enter, proceed and graduate and must successfully complete (pass) a minimum of 120 credits which fulfill all of the following requirements.

In order to graduate with an Honours iBA degree, students must achieve satisfactory academic standing to enter, proceed and graduate and must successfully complete (pass) a minimum of 120 credits which fulfill all of the following requirements.

Bachelor of Arts (BA)

  • Residency requirement: a minimum of 30 course credits and at least half (50 per cent) of the course credits required in each undergraduate degree program major/minor must be taken at York University;
  • Graduation requirement: students must successfully complete (pass) at least 90 credits that meet the Faculty's degree and program requirements with a cumulative grade point average of at least 4.00;
  • General education: to fulfill the liberal arts & professional studies general education requirements students must take 21 credits of general education including: 6.00 credits in natural science (NATS); A 9.00 credit approved general education course in the social science or humanities categories; and a 6.00 credit approved general education course in the opposite category to the 9.00 credit course in the social science or humanities already taken. (Note: for recommended general education courses by program, please refer to your program of study);
  • Major credits: as defined by the specific program; a minimum of 30 credits, including at least 12 credits at the 3000 or 4000 level.
  • Upper-level credits: at least 18 credits at the 3000 or 4000 level including 12 credits in the major;
  • Credits outside the major: at least 18 credits.

Specialized Honours Bachelor of Arts (Specialized Honours BA)

  • Residency requirement: a minimum of 30 course credits and at least half (50 per cent) of the course credits required in each undergraduate degree program major/minor must be taken at York University;
  • Graduation requirement: students must successfully complete (pass) at least 120 credits which meet the Faculty's degree and program requirements with a cumulative grade point average of at least 5.00;
  • General education: to fulfill the liberal arts & professional studies general education requirements students must take 21 credits of general education including: 6.00 credits in natural science (NATS); A 9.00 credit approved general education course in the social science or humanities categories; and a 6.00 credit approved general education course in the opposite category to the 9.00 credit course in the social science or humanities already taken. (Note: for recommended general education courses by program, please refer to your program of study);
  • Major credits: as defined by the specific program, a minimum of 54 credits, including at least 12 credits at the 4000 level;
  • Upper-level credits: at least 36 credits at the 3000 or 4000 level, including at least 18 credits at the 4000 level;
  • Credits outside the major: at least 18 credits.

Honours Bachelor of Arts (Honours BA)

  • Residency requirement: a minimum of 30 course credits and at least half (50 per cent) of the course credits required in each undergraduate degree program major/minor must be taken at York University;
  • Graduation requirement: students must successfully complete (pass) at least 120 credits which meet the Faculty's degree and program requirements with a cumulative grade point average of at least 5.00;
  • General education: to fulfill the liberal arts & professional studies general education requirements students must take 21 credits of general education including: 6.00 credits in natural science (NATS); A 9.00 credit approved general education course in the social science or humanities categories; and a 6.00 credit approved general education course in the opposite category to the 9.00 credit course in the social science or humanities already taken. (Note: for recommended general education courses by program, please refer to your program of study);
  • Major credits: as defined by the specific program, a minimum of 42 credits, including at least 12 credits at the 4000 level;
  • Upper-level credits: at least 36 credits at the 3000 or 4000 level, including at least 18 credits at the 4000 level;
  • Credits outside the major: at least 18 credits.

Honours Double Major Bachelor of Arts (Honours Double Major BA)

  • Residency requirement: a minimum of 30 course credits and at least half (50 per cent) of the course credits required in each undergraduate degree program major/minor must be taken at York University;
  • Graduation requirement: students must successfully complete (pass) at least 120 credits which meet the Faculty's degree and program requirements with a cumulative grade point average of at least 5.00;
  • General education: to fulfill the liberal arts & professional studies general education requirements students must take 21 credits of general education including: 6.00 credits in natural science (NATS); A 9.00 credit approved general education course in the social science or humanities categories; and a 6.00 credit approved general education course in the opposite category to the 9.00 credit course in the social science or humanities already taken. (Note: for recommended general education courses by program, please refer to your program of study);
  • Major credits: as defined by the specific programs; a minimum of 42 credits in each of the majors, at least 12 credits of which must be at the 4000 level in each of the major programs. In a double major program, a course may count for major credit towards only one major;
  • Upper-level credits: at least 36 credits at the 3000 or 4000 level, including at least 18 credits at the 4000 level;
  • Credits outside the major: students who graduate in this program are deemed to have fulfilled this requirement.

Honours Double Major Interdisciplinary Bachelor of Arts - Linked (Honours Double Major Interdisciplinary BA - Linked)

  • Residency requirement: a minimum of 30 course credits and at least half (50 per cent) of the course credits required in each undergraduate degree program major/minor must be taken at York University;
  • Graduation requirement: students must successfully complete (pass) at least 120 credits which meet the Faculty's degree and program requirements with a cumulative grade point average of at least 5.00;
  • General education: to fulfill the liberal arts & professional studies general education requirements students must take 21 credits of general education including: 6.00 credits in natural science (NATS); A 9.00 credit approved general education course in the social science or humanities categories; and a 6.00 credit approved general education course in the opposite category to the 9.00 credit course in the social science or humanities already taken. (Note: for recommended general education courses by program, please refer to your program of study);
  • Major credits: as defined by the specific programs; a minimum of 36 credits in each of the majors, including at least six credits at the 4000 level in each of the major programs. In a double major interdisciplinary program, a course may count for major credit towards only one major;
  • Upper-level credits: at least 36 credits at the 3000 or 4000 level, including at least 18 credits at the 4000 level;
  • Credits outside the major: students who graduate in this program are deemed to have fulfilled this requirement.

Honours Major/Minor Bachelor of Arts (Honours Major/Minor BA)

  • Residency requirement: a minimum of 30 course credits and at least half (50 per cent) of the course credits required in each undergraduate degree program major/minor must be taken at York University;
  • Graduation requirement: students must successfully complete (pass) at least 120 credits which meet the Faculty's degree and program requirements with a cumulative grade point average of at least 5.00;
  • General education: to fulfill the liberal arts & professional studies general education requirements students must take 21 credits of general education including: 6.00 credits in natural science (NATS); A 9.00 credit approved general education course in the social science or humanities categories; and a 6.00 credit approved general education course in the opposite category to the 9.00 credit course in the social science or humanities already taken. (Note: for recommended general education courses by program, please refer to your program of study);
  • Major/Minor credits: as defined by the specific programs:
    • Major: a minimum of 42 credits in the major, including at least 12 credits at the 4000 level in the major;
    • Minor: a minimum of 30 credits in the minor, normally including at least six credits at the 4000 level in the minor.
  • In a major/minor program, a course may count only once toward major credit or minor credit;
  • Upper-level credits: at least 36 credits at the 3000 or 4000 level, including at least 18 credits at the 4000 level;
  • Credits outside the major: students who graduate in this program are deemed to have fulfilled this requirement.

Honours International Bachelor of Arts (Honours iBA)

  • Residency requirement: a minimum of 30 course credits and at least half (50 per cent) of the course credits required in each undergraduate degree program major/minor must be taken at York University;
  • Graduation requirement: students must successfully complete (pass) at least 120 credits which meet the Faculty's degree and program requirements with a cumulative grade point average of at least 5.00;
  • General education: to fulfill the liberal arts & professional studies general education requirements students must take 21 credits of general education including: 6.00 credits in natural science (NATS); A 9.00 credit approved general education course in the social science or humanities categories; and a 6.00 credit approved general education course in the opposite category to the 9.00 credit course in the social science or humanities already taken. (Note: for recommended general education courses by program, please refer to your program of study);
  • Major credits: as defined by the specific program; a minimum of 42 credits, including at least 12 credits at the 4000 level;
  • Required course: AP/ANTH 2300 3.00 Intercultural Training Skills completed before the term or terms abroad. Note: This course is considered to be outside the major (even for ANTH students);
  • Language study credits: at least 18 credits in a modern language offered by York University, including the Advanced I university-level course in the chosen language. Up to six (6) language credits may be taken while the student is abroad. Such courses must be approved by the coordinator of the relevant language section in the Department of Languages, Literatures and Linguistics. If a iBA student is fluent in a language, he/she will undergo an examination to test language proficiency by the Department of Languages, Literatures and Linguistics. Students exempted from one or more of the language courses required for the degree must complete cultural courses related to that language.
  • Internationally-oriented credits: at least 9 credits of internationally-oriented courses chosen outside the major;
  • International exchange: at least one full term abroad as a full-time student at one of York University’s exchange partners;
  • Upper-level credits: at least 36 credits at the 3000 or 4000 level including at least 18 credits at the 4000 level;
  • Credits outside the major: at least 18 credits.

Note: for the Honours iBA, courses taken outside the major to satisfy the language study requirement and/or the internationally-oriented course credits can also be used to satisfy the credits outside the major requirement.

Honours Major/Minor International Bachelor of Arts (Honours Major/Minor iBA)

  • Residency requirement: a minimum of 30 course credits and at least half (50 per cent) of the course credits required in each undergraduate degree program major/minor must be taken at York University;
  • Graduation requirement: students must successfully complete (pass) at least 120 credits which meet the Faculty's degree and program requirements with a cumulative grade point average of at least 5.00;
  • General education: to fulfill the liberal arts & professional studies general education requirements students must take 21 credits of general education including: 6.00 credits in natural science (NATS); A 9.00 credit approved general education course in the social science or humanities categories; and a 6.00 credit approved general education course in the opposite category to the 9.00 credit course in the social science or humanities already taken. (Note: for recommended general education courses by program, please refer to your program of study);
  • Major/Minor credits: as defined by the specific programs:
    • Major: a minimum of 42 credits in the major, including at least 12 credits at the 4000 level in the major;
    • Minor: a minimum of 30 credits in the minor, including at least six credits at the 4000 level in the minor.
  • In a major/minor program, a course may count only once toward major credit or minor credit;
  • Language study credits: at least 18 credits in a modern language offered by York University, including the Advanced I university-level course in the chosen language;
  • Internationally-oriented courses: at least 12 credits of internationally-oriented courses chosen outside the major;
  • International exchange: at least one full term abroad as a full-time student at one of York University’s exchange partners;
  • Upper-level credits: at least 36 credits at the 3000 or 4000 level including at least 18 credits at the 4000 level;
  • Credits outside the major: students who graduate in this program are deemed to have fulfilled this requirement.

Programs with Other Faculties (Honours Double Major, Major/Minor)1

Students in the Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies may combine any Honours Major program that offers a double major or major/minor option with approved Honours Double Major or Honours Major/Minor programs offered within the Faculty or by the Faculties of Environmental Studies, Health, or Science, the School of the Arts, Media, Performance and Design, or the Lassonde School of Engineering, subject to the following:

students must maintain Honours standing, a cumulative grade point average of 5.00 or above for all courses taken at York. Students in an Honours BA whose cumulative grade point average is below 5.00, may proceed in Honours providing they meet the minimum Honours progression requirement;

students registered in any Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies degree or program must complete at least half (50 per cent) of each major or minor at York;

in some instances, in order to complete the requirements of an Honours Double Major or Honours Major/Minor program, it may be necessary to successfully complete (pass) more than 120 credits;

Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies degree requirements and program regulations apply;

Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies students successfully completing a BA, BDEM Honours Double Major or BA, BDEM or BPA Honours Major/Minor programs combined with other programs or Faculties will receive the applicable BA, BDEM or BPA Honours degree.

Faculty of Environmental Studies

Students in the Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies may combine any Honours Double Major BA, BDEM or Honours Major/Minor BA, BDEM or BPA program with the Faculty of Environmental Studies. For details about the program requirements in environmental studies, students should consult the Faculty.

Faculty of Health

Students in the Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies may combine any Honours Double Major BA, BDEM or Honours Major/Minor BA, BDEM or BPA program with the Faculty of Health. For details about the program requirements in the Faculty of Health, students should consult the Faculty.

Faculty of Science

Students in the Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies may combine any Honours Double Major BA, BDEM or Honours Major/Minor BA, BDEM or BPA program with the Faculty of Science. For details about the program requirements in the Faculty of Science, students should consult the Faculty.

Lassonde School of Engineering

Students in the Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies may combine any Honours Double Major BA, BDEM or Honours Major/Minor BA, BDEM or BPA program with the Lassonde School of Engineering. For details about those program requirements, students should consult the Lassonde School of Engineering.

Note: information technology may not be combined with computer science as either a Double Major or Major/Minor program.

School of the Arts, Media, Performance and Design

Students in the Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies may combine any Honours Double Major BA, BDEM or Honours Major/Minor BA, BDEM or BPA program with the School of the Arts, Media, Performance and Design. For details about those program requirements, students should consult the School of the Arts, Media, Performance and Design.

Co-registration in the Faculty of Education

Students enrolled in a BA program in the Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies may apply for admission to the Pre-Service program of the Faculty of Education. If they are accepted, they may co-register in the Faculty of Education and upon successful completion of the separate degree requirements of both Faculties will be awarded two degrees: Honours bachelor of arts (BA) or bachelor of arts (BA) and bachelor of education (BEd).

Although liberal arts and professional studies and education courses are taken concurrently, they are counted separately by each Faculty. Grade point averages for courses in the two Faculties are also calculated separately. The 30 credits required for the BEd are independent of the 120 credits required for the Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies Honours BA or the 90 credits required for the BA. Therefore, a student completing the requirements for both degrees would complete a minimum total of 150 credits for the Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies Honours BA/BEd or 120 credits for the Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies BA/BEd.

Credit for Education Courses

Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies students who are co-registered in the Faculty of Education may count education courses taken beyond the requirements for the BEd for credit towards the Honours BA or BA degree as credits outside the major.

Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies students who are not co-registered in the Faculty of Education may receive degree credit for academic courses offered by the Faculty of Education as credits outside the major.

1. Students in the Faculties of Environmental Studies, Health, or Science, the School of the Arts, Media, Performance and Design, or the Lassonde School of Engineering may also combine an Honours Double Major BA or Honours Major/Minor BA program with the Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies. For further details, consult with your home Faculty.

Exigences de programme spécifique

Program-Specific Degree Requirements

For purposes of meeting program requirements, all nine-credit general education (foundation) courses will count as six credits towards the major or minor.

All approved general education courses may count for general education credits; some may count for major credits; none may count as both.

The Department of Geography and the Urban Studies program also offer a Specialized Honours degree in geography and urban studies; for details refer to the Geography and Urban Studies section.

Specialized Honours BA: 120 Credits

Residency requirement: a minimum of 30 course credits and at least half (50 per cent) of the course credits required in each undergraduate degree program major/minor must be taken at York University.

Graduation requirement: students must successfully complete (pass) at least 120 credits which meet the Faculty's degree and program requirements with a cumulative grade point average of at least 5.00.

General education: a minimum of 21 general education credits as follows:

  • 6.00 credits in natural science (NATS)
  • a 9.00 credit approved general education course in the social science or humanities categories
  • a 6.00 credit approved general education course in the opposite category to the 9.00 credit course in social science or humanities already taken

Major credits: students will take at least 54 credits in urban studies including the following:

Upper-level credits: at least 36 credits at the 3000 or 4000 level, including at least 18 credits at the 4000 level.

Credits outside the major: at least 18 credits.

Honours BA: 120 Credits

Residency requirement: a minimum of 30 course credits and at least half (50 per cent) of the course credits required in each undergraduate degree program major/minor must be taken at York University.

Graduation requirement: students must successfully complete (pass) at least 120 credits which meet the Faculty's degree and program requirements with a cumulative grade point average of at least 5.00.

General education: a minimum of 21 general education credits as follows:

  • 6.00 credits in natural science (NATS)
  • a 9.00 credit approved general education course in the social science or humanities categories
  • a 6.00 credit approved general education course in the opposite category to the 9.00 credit course in social science or humanities already taken

Major credits: students will take at least 42 credits in urban studies including the following:

Upper-level credits: at least 36 credits at the 3000 or 4000 level, including at least 18 credits at the 4000 level.

Credits outside the major: at least 18 credits. (Note: students who are completing a double major or major/minor are deemed to have fulfilled this requirement.)

Honours Double Major BA

The Honours BA program described above may be pursued jointly with approved Honours Double Major degree programs in the Faculties of Environmental Studies, Health, Liberal Arts and Professional Studies, or Science, the School of the Arts, Media, Performance and Design, or the Lassonde School of Engineering. For further details on requirements, refer to the listings for specific Honours programs that may be pursued jointly with other Faculties.

Note: in a double major program, a course may count only once toward major credit.

Honours Double Major Interdisciplinary (Linked) BA

Urban studies may be linked with the following Honours Double Major Interdisciplinary BA programs in the Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies: Latin American and Caribbean Studies, African Studies, Social and Political Thought, South Asian Studies, European Studies. Students must take at least 36 credits in urban studies and at least 36 credits in the interdisciplinary program. Courses taken to meet urban studies requirements cannot also be used to meet the requirements of the interdisciplinary program. Students in these interdisciplinary programs must take a total of at least 18 credits at the 4000 level, including at least six credits in urban studies and six credits in the interdisciplinary program. For further details of requirements, refer to the listings for specific Honours Double Major Interdisciplinary BA programs.

Note: in a double major program, a course may count only once toward major credit.

Major credits: the 36 credits in urban studies must include:

Honours Major/Minor BA

The Honours BA program described above may be pursued jointly with approved Honours Minor degree programs in the Faculties of Environmental Studies, Health, Liberal Arts and Professional Studies, or Science, the School of the Arts, Media, Performance and Design, or the Lassonde School of Engineering. For further details on requirements, refer to the listings for specific Honours programs that may be pursued jointly with other Faculties.

Note: in a major/minor program, a course may count only once toward major credit or minor credit.

Honours Minor BA

The Honours Minor BA program described may be combined with any approved Honours BA program that offers a major/minor option in the Faculties of Environmental Studies, Health, Liberal Arts and Professional Studies, or Science, the School of the Arts, Media, Performance and Design, or the Lassonde School of Engineering. For further details on requirements, refer to the listings for specific Honours programs that may be pursued jointly with other Faculties.

Note: in a major/minor program, a course may count only once toward major credit or minor credit.

Minor credits: the Honours Minor in urban studies comprises at least 30 credits including the following:

Note: at least six credits in the minor must be at the 4000 level.

BA: 90 Credits

Residency requirement: a minimum of 30 course credits and at least half (50 per cent) of the course credits required in each undergraduate degree program major/minor must be taken at York University.

Graduation requirement: students must successfully complete (pass) at least 90 credits that meet the Faculty's degree and program requirements with a cumulative grade point average of at least 4.00.

General education: a minimum of 21 general education credits as follows:

  • 6.00 credits in natural science (NATS)
  • a 9.00 credit approved general education course in the social science or humanities categories
  • a 6.00 credit approved general education course in the opposite category to the 9.00 credit course in social science or humanities already taken

Major credits: students will take at least 30 credits including the following:

Note: at least 12 credits in the major at the 3000 level or above.

Upper-level credits: at least 18 credits at the 3000 or 4000 level.

Credits outside the major: at least 18 credits.

Honours iBA: 120 Credits

Residency requirement: a minimum of 30 course credits and at least half (50 per cent) of the course credits required in each undergraduate degree program major/minor must be taken at York University.

Graduation requirement: students must successfully complete (pass) at least 120 credits which meet the Faculty's degree and program requirements with a cumulative grade point average of at least 5.00.

General education: a minimum of 21 general education credits as follows:

  • 6.00 credits in natural science (NATS)
  • a 9.00 credit approved general education course in the social science or humanities categories
  • a 6.00 credit approved general education course in the opposite category to the 9.00 credit course in social science or humanities already taken

Major credits: students will take at least 42 credits in urban studies including the following:

Note: at least 12 credits in the major at the 4000 level.

In addition, students in the Honours iBA program must fulfill the following requirements:

Required Course: AP/ANTH 2300 3.00 Intercultural Training Skills must be completed before the International Exchange/Experience requirement of the degree.  Note: This course is considered to be outside the major (even for ANTH students).

Language study credits: at least 18 credits in a modern language offered by York University, including the Advanced I university-level course in the chosen language. Up to six (6) language credits may be taken while the student is abroad. Such courses must be approved by the coordinator of the relevant language section in the Department of Languages, Literatures and Linguistics.

If an iBA student is fluent in a language, he/she will undergo an examination to test language proficiency by the Department of Languages, Literatures and Linguistics. Students exempted from one or more of the language courses required for the degree must complete cultural courses related to that language.

Internationally-oriented credits: at least 9 credits of internationally-oriented courses to be completed from the list of pre-approved courses; these courses can be additional courses in your major.

International exchange: at least one full term abroad as a full-time student at one of York University’s exchange partners.

Upper-level credits: at least 36 credits at the 3000 or 4000 level, including at least 18 credits at the 4000 level.

Credits outside the major: at least 18 credits. (Note: for the Honours iBA, courses taken outside the major to satisfy the language study requirement and/or the internationally-oriented course credits can also be used to satisfy the outside the major requirement. Students who are completing a double major major/minor are deemed to have fulfilled this requirement.)

Honours Major/Minor iBA

The Honours iBA program described above may be pursued jointly with any Honours Minor BA program in the Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies.

Note: in a major/minor program, a course may count only once toward major credit or minor credit.

Urban Studies Courses

Not all of the courses listed below will necessarily be offered in any given year.

With the approval of the program coordinator, and subject to course exclusion and residency requirements, students may complete other courses for program credit in urban studies.

 

  • General Information
  • The following regulations apply to students taking courses in the Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies. Applicants seeking admission are referred to the Regulations Governing Admission to the Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies, York University.

    All students are required to:

    • observe the regulations of the Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies and the University;
    • maintain a satisfactory standard of work;
    • have discharged all financial liability to the University prior to graduation.

    Undergraduate Degrees

    Candidates admitted to a Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies degree program are required to:

    • have been admitted to York University as degree students;
    • satisfy all the corequisite(s) and prerequisite(s) for courses selected for enrolment;
    • satisfy the program and degree requirements for one of the following degrees:
      • bachelor of arts
        • Honours BA
        • Specialized Honours BA
        • BA
      • international bachelor of arts
        • Honours iBA
        • Specialized Honours iBA
      • bachelor of administrative studies
        • Honours BAS
        • BAS
      • bachelor of disaster and emergency management
        • Honours BDEM
        • BDEM
      • bachelor of human resources management
        • Honours BHRM
        • BHRM
      • bachelor of public administration
        • Honours BPA
      • bachelor of social work
        • Honours BSW

    Candidates for Reclassifying a Bachelor Degree as an Honours Degree

    Students who have graduated and wish to reclassify their degree to Honours must at the point of completing 90 passed credits have met the minimum academic standing for Honours (grade point averages) and maintained that standing upon graduation.

  • Certificate Regulations
  • Undergraduate Certificates

    Definition: ”Undergraduate Certificate” is the term applied to a program of studies attesting to a level of competence or skills in a particular area or field. It is distinct from a defined undergraduate degree program, stream, specialization or formal concentration. A certificate recognized a specific grouping of courses that:

    • are cross-disciplinary but with a thematic coherence;
    • form a coherent yet distinctive complement to the major of a degree program;
    • lead to the acquisition of specific skills or professional expertise that may meet requirements of outside accrediting bodies.

    Advanced Certificates: as described by the program.

    Cross-disciplinary Certificates

    Definition: A cluster of courses in a defined thematic area of interest, which are not confined to a single disciplinary area of study or major.

    Minimum Standards. 24 credits, at least 18 of which must be at the 2000 level or above, including six credits at the 3000 or 4000 level. In order to receive the certificate candidates must present a cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 4.00 or greater in the courses taken to satisfy certificate requirements.

    Disciplinary Certificates

    Definition: A series of courses in a specific area of study that form a distinctive complement to studies in an undergraduate major discipline. The majority of courses taken towards the certificate will be in one major discipline. Whenever a student’s major discipline coincides with that of the certificate not all of the course credits used to satisfy certificate requirements may also be used to satisfy degree major requirements.

    Minimum Standards. 24 credits, 18 of which would normally be at the 3000 level or above. At least 12 credits of the disciplinary courses that satisfy certificate requirements must be in addition to those used to satisfy requirements of an undergraduate major. In order to receive the certificate candidates must present a cumulative GPA of 4.0 or greater in the courses taken to satisfy certificate requirements.

    Certificate of Proficiency

    Definition: An acknowledgement of proficiency (normally in a language) in a given area.

    Minimum Standards. There would normally be a comprehensive examination in addition to course requirements (normally 12 credits). In order to receive the certificate candidates must present a cumulative GPA of 4.00 or greater in the courses taken to satisfy certificate requirements, although language certificates normally have higher requirements.

    General certificates: as described by the program.

    Professional Certificates

    Definition: A series of courses that build specific skills and/or competencies often related to a professional expertise such as might be recognized by an external professional body.

    Minimum Standards. Normally 24 credits, 18 credits of which would be at the 3000 level or above. In most cases, at least 12 credits of the disciplinary courses that satisfy certificate requirements must be in addition for those used to satisfy requirements of an undergraduate major being completed concurrently. In order to receive the certificate, candidates must present a cumulative GPA of 4.00 or greater in the courses taken to satisfy certificate requirements.

    Note: to obtain a professional certificate offered by the School of Administrative Studies or the School of Human Resources Management, at least 18 credits of the ADMS course credits that satisfy certificate requirements must be in addition to those used to satisfy a degree.

    General Regulations

    Program requirements are reviewed and approved by Faculty Council and Senate. Normally, Undergraduate Certificates will be completed concurrently with an undergraduate degree program and are differentiated from a degree program by a higher GPA requirement (the 4.00 specified above is a lower limit) or a more focused selection of courses. However, direct-entry, stand-alone certificate programs are available and are primarily intended to meet the need for specific professional preparation. Such direct entry certificate programs will generally be in the nature of either career-entry or mid-career development, and candidates will normally already hold a degree or have significant post-secondary education. While most certificate programs (except for the Certificate of Proficiency) will require close to the minimum 24 credits, thereby differentiating a certificate from major requirements within a degree program, it is expected that some Professional Certificate programs will justify lower or higher credit requirements on the basis of standards or academic requirements set by external professional bodies. Cross-Disciplinary and Disciplinary Certificates might also in special circumstances justify a higher total-credit requirement, but normally not more than 36 credits. A certificate that requires 36 credits or more may be designated as advanced. Since certificate courses are credit courses, admission requirements will be equivalent to those for an undergraduate degree program.

    Undergraduate Certificate Courses. Undergraduate Certificate Programs are composed of courses which have been approved for credit in an undergraduate degree program. Each Program is responsible for determining which courses are acceptable for satisfaction of the Certificate Program requirements.

    Minimum Requirements for Multiple Certificates. Students may acquire more than one certificate provided that at least 18 credits in each certificate are unique to the specific certificate.

    Admission. Students seeking direct entry to a certificate program must submit written application when applying for admission to the University. Students already enrolled in an undergraduate degree program are also expected to apply for entry to a certificate program, normally prior to completion of 36 credits of their undergraduate degree program. Applications should be obtained and filed with the unit administering the certificate program.

    Note: depending on the undergraduate certificate, students may have an option of completing the certificate concurrently or consecutively. Please refer to the specific undergraduate certificate for further details and requirements.

    A student who wishes to change from a certificate to a degree must re-apply to the York University Admissions Office.

    Students enrolled in a certificate program and who are not concurrently enrolled in a degree program may take only the courses required for the completion of the certificate.

    Residency requirement. The University residency requirement for undergraduate certificate programs is 18 credits for certificate programs requiring up to 36 credits and 50 per cent of the required credits for certificates comprising more than 36 credits. Normally, for undergraduate certificate programs requiring 18 credits or less, all credits are completed at York.

    Graduating with a certificate. Except where otherwise stated, a minimum cumulative grade point average of 4.00 is required to satisfy certificate requirements. Students must also submit an Application to Graduate with a Certificate form. Applications should be obtained from and filed with the unit administering the certificate program. Transcript notation that the requirements for a certificate have been completed will be made once the Registrar’s Office has received notice from the unit administering the program. Certificates will not be conferred until candidates have successfully completed an undergraduate degree program if they are simultaneously enrolled in a degree and a certificate program.

    The Faculty does not award certificates retroactively.

    Certificates of Completion

    Definition: Certificates of Completion are awarded for the successful completion of an access or bridging program, which are defined as a designated program of study designed to “bridge” students into an academic degree program. The Certificates of Completion are distinct from both an undergraduate certificate and a non-degree studies certificate. A Certificate of Completion recognizes a student’s accomplishment in a specified grouping of courses designed to lead to the acquisition of academic skills and knowledge necessary to perform successfully in an academic degree program, where that recognition may be desirable for external audiences.

    General Regulations

    Access / bridging program requirements are reviewed and approved by Faculty Council (if appropriate) and Senate. In order to receive the Certificate of Completion of the program, candidates must meet the minimum requirements as stated by the program to satisfy certificate requirements. The certificate program is normally a direct-entry stand-alone program primarily intended to prepare students to meet the needs of an academic degree. In this way, the Certificate of Completion recognizes the successful passage across a “bridge” into a university degree program. Normally, this “bridge” will be into the first year of a university degree for students with no prior university education and will be into an advanced level for students with international university education, and/or other post-secondary education credentials. The requirements of a Certificate of Completion may include a combination of academic and non-academic credits, or consist solely of academic credits, with a minimum requirement of 12.0 academic credits in either model.

    Certificate Courses for Academic Credit: Courses for academic credit are courses which have been otherwise approved for academic credit. Each Certificate Program is responsible for determining which courses are acceptable and satisfy the Certificate Program requirements.

    Certificate Activities for Non-credit: Activities for non-credit workshops/courses/modules are designed to supplement the academic credit by offering students exposure to the range of learning, professional and communication skills, and related cultural knowledge, for example, necessary to successful performance in an academic degree. Each Certificate Program is responsible for determining this content.

    Admissions Application: Students seeking direct entry to a Certificate of Completion program must submit a written application when applying for admission to the University. Applications should be obtained from and filed with the University’s Office of Admissions.

    Residency Requirements: Students will complete all required academic and non-academic credits at York or at an institution collaborating with York in an Inter-Institutional Program. Thus, the University residency requirement for programs eligible for the Certificate of Completion is normally 100% of the required credits but in no case less than 60% of the total combination of academic and non-academic credits.

    Awarding of Certificates: Certificates will be awarded upon successful completion of the program. Normally, students receiving a Certificate of Completion will be eligible for internal transfer directly into select degree programs, subject to the admissions requirements and prerequisites of the program.

    Transcript Notation: A transcript notation that the requirements for a certificate have been completed will be made once the Registrar’s Office has received notice from the unit administering the program.

  • Recognition of Academic Excellence
  • Academic Achievement List

    The Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies Sessional Academic Achievement List recognizes the outstanding achievement of the following students:

    1. Students taking 12 to 17 credits in a given session who have attained a sessional grade point average of 8.00 or higher.
    2. Students taking 18 or more credits in a given session who have attained a sessional grade point average of 7.50 or higher.

    Graduating with Honours or Bachelor Academic Standing

    Students with high grade point averages are eligible for the following recognition upon graduation from the Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies.

    Summa cum laude: 8.00 or above cumulative grade point average.

    Magna cum laude: 7.80 to 7.99 cumulative grade point average.

    Cum laude: 7.50 to 7.79 cumulative grade point average.

    Dean’s Honour Roll: 7.00 cumulative grade point average.

  • Academic Standards
  • Academic standing depends on several factors, including the number of courses a student has passed (including transfer credits), the grade point average achieved during a particular session (sessional grade point average) and the overall grade point average (cumulative grade point average).

    Change of program. Students may request to change their program of study after completion of their first academic session in the Faculty, provided they meet the minimum academic standards and entry requirements for the program requested. Students must follow requirements of the program in place at the point of entry. A Program Change Request, available on the Program Change web page at http://myacademicrecord.students.yorku.ca/program-change, must be submitted. Some programs may require school/department approval. For details of individual programs, refer to the Programs of Study section. Also consult the section on Academic Standing.

    Bachelor of Arts (Honours BA, Honours iBA) Degrees (120 Credits)

    Entry. Students may enter/re-enter prior to the completion of 90 credits. Some programs may have limited entry and/or further entry requirements. Some programs have mathematics entry requirements. Students should refer to the program of study section for further information on these and other requirements. Students who are ineligible to continue in Honours may re-enter Honours if they raise their cumulative grade point average to 5.00 (C+) or above by the time they have successfully completed their 90th credit.

    Students qualify for faculty transfer to a Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies Honours program provided they have met the minimum Honours progression requirement. Students from other Faculties may submit a Program Change Request, available on the Program Change web page at http://myacademicrecord.students.yorku.ca/program-change, to enter the Honours BA or Honours iBA program.

    Note: all students who enter/re-enter the program must follow the requirements of the program in place at the time of entry/re-entry.

    Continuing in Honours. To continue in an Honours program, students must maintain a cumulative grade point average of at least 5.00. Students whose cumulative grade point average falls below 5.00 during the course of their studies may proceed in an Honours program, on warning, provided they meet the year level progression requirements described below.

    Honours standing grade point average requirement. Students who have completed less than 84 earned credits whose cumulative grade point average is below 5.00 may continue in Honours provided they meet the minimum year level progression requirements as follows:

    Year Level Earned Credits Minimum cumulative grade point average
    1
    0-23
    4.00
    2
    24-53
    4.25
    3
    54-83
    4.80
    4
    84 and above
    5.00

    Note: year level is based on the number of earned credits including transfer credit.

    Courses taken beyond the normal maximum. Students in an Honours program who successfully complete (pass) more than 120 credits and whose cumulative grade point average is at least 5.00 will have all credits counted towards their Honours and their cumulative grade point average.

    Graduating with an Honours BA or Honours iBA degree. To graduate in an Honours program, students must successfully complete (pass) at least 120 credits which meet Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies degree and program requirements. The cumulative grade point average must be at least 5.00.

    Failure to maintain minimum Honours standing (BA, iBA). Students who do not meet the conditions outlined above may continue their studies only in a BA degree program. Students who are ineligible to continue in Honours may re-enter Honours if they raise their cumulative grade point average to 5.00 or above by the time they have successfully completed (passed) their 90th credit. No extra courses may be taken in a subsequent session in an effort to raise the grade point average to qualify for Honours. Please refer to the Academic Warnings and Penalties section.

    Opting to graduate with a BA degree (90 credits). Students who are eligible for Honours may opt to graduate in a BA program in the session in which they have completed their final course(s).

    Bachelor of Arts (BA) Degree (90 Credits)

    Entry. Students may enter/re-enter prior to completion of 90 credits. Some programs may have limited entry and/or further entry requirements. Some programs have mathematics entry requirements. Students should refer to the program of study section for further information on these and other requirements.

    Students may transfer to Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies BA degree provided they meet the minimum cumulative grade point average of 4.00. Students from other Faculties may submit a Program Change Request, available on the Program Change web page at http://myacademicrecord.students.yorku.ca/program-change, to enter the BA program.

    Note: all students who enter/re-enter the BA program must follow the requirements of the program in place at the time of entry/re-entry. Some programs may have limited entry and/or further entry requirements.

    Continuing. Students who maintain a cumulative grade point average of at least 4.00 may proceed in good standing in the BA degree. Students who at the end of an academic session meet the minimum Honours progression requirement will automatically be placed in the Honours program (if applicable). Students at the point of enrolment in a new academic session can declare via the enrolment system if they wish to proceed in the BA or Honours BA degree.

    Courses taken beyond the normal maximum. Students in a bachelor program who successfully complete (pass) more than 90 credits and whose cumulative grade point average is at least 4.00 will have all credits counted towards their cumulative grade point average.

    Graduating with a BA degree. Students must successfully complete (pass) at least 90 credits that meet the Faculty’s degree and program requirements with a cumulative grade point average of at least 4.00.

    Failure to maintain minimum BA standing (advising recommended). Students who have successfully completed (passed) less than 90 credits whose cumulative grade point average is below 4.00 will be placed on academic warning and may continue in the BA program only. Please refer to the Academic Warnings and Penalties section.

    Additional credits to raise grade point average to qualify for graduation. Students in a BA degree who have successfully completed (passed) 90 credits in accordance with Faculty and program requirements, but whose cumulative grade point average is below 4.00, will be allowed a maximum of 12 attempted credits beyond the 90 passed credits in an effort to raise their cumulative grade point average to at least 4.00 to qualify for graduation. New courses, repeated courses, passed courses and failed courses will count towards the total maximum number of attempted credits. These courses must be taken at York University.

    Students who have 90 passed credits and have attempted 12 credits beyond the 90, who fail to attain the minimum required cumulative grade point average of 4.00 will be ineligible to continue or graduate.

    Bachelor of Commerce (Honours BCom) Degree (120 Credits)

    Entry. Students prior to entering Honours BCom are required to have one high school 4U mathematics courses which must be MHF4U (Advanced Functions) or the equivalent. Students majoring in BCom information technology are required to have completed one 4U high school mathematics course or the equivalent within the last five years, prior to entry. Students with less than 90 passed credits completed require a minimum cumulative grade point average of 5.00. At the point of completing 90 passed credits, students in the Honours BCom who have not attained the minimum cumulative and major grade point average of 5.00 will be ineligible to enter/re-enter the Honours BCom program. No extra courses may be taken in a subsequent session in an effort to raise the grade point average to enter/re-enter the BCom program. Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies students may submit a Program Change Request, available on the Program Change web page at http://myacademicrecord.students.yorku.ca/program-change, to enter/re-enter the Honours BCom program.

    Students from other Faculties may submit a Program Change Request, available on the Program Change web page at http://myacademicrecord.students.yorku.ca/program-change, to enter the Honours BCom program.

    Note: all students who enter/re-enter the Honours BCom program must follow the requirements of the program in place at the time of entry/re-entry. Some programs may have limited entry.

    Continuing Honours BCom students. Students who have completed less than 90 passed credits and maintain a cumulative grade point average of at least 5.00 may proceed in good standing in the Honours BCom degree. Students who have completed 90 passed credits with a cumulative and major average of at least 5.00 and have less than 120 passed credits may proceed in Honours.

    Students who have completed at least 120 passed credits that have a minimum cumulative grade point average of at least 5.00 and a major grade point average of at least 5.50 may continue in Honours, if program requirements are not met, or may apply to graduate.

    Graduating with an Honours BCom degree. Students must successfully complete (pass) at least 120 credits which meet the Faculty’s degree and program requirements with a cumulative grade point average of at least 5.00 and a major grade point average of at least 5.50.

    Courses taken beyond the normal maximum. Students who have completed 120 credits or greater who have a minimum cumulative grade point average of 5.00 and a major grade point average of 5.50 will have all credits counted towards their Honours and their cumulative grade point average.

    Failure to maintain minimum Honours BCom standing (advising recommended). Students who have completed less than 90 passed credits whose cumulative grade point average is below 5.00 will be placed on “program warning” and may continue in the 90 credit BCom degree only, provided they meet the program warning conditions. Please refer to the Academic Warnings and Penalties section.

    Opting to graduate with a BCom degree (90 credits). Students who are eligible for Honours may opt to graduate in a BCom program in the session in which they have completed their final course(s).

    Bachelor of Commerce (BCom) Degree (90 Credits)

    Entry. Students prior to entering BCom are required to have one high school 4U mathematics courses which must be MHF4U (Advanced Functions) or the equivalent. Students with less than 90 passed credits completed require a minimum cumulative grade point average of 5.00. At the point of completing 90 passed credits students who have not attained the minimum cumulative and major grade point average of 5.00 will be ineligible to enter/re-enter the program. No extra courses may be taken in a subsequent session in an effort to raise the grade point average to enter/re-enter the BCom program. Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies students may submit a Program Change Request, available on the Program Change web page at http://myacademicrecord.students.yorku.ca/program-change, to enter/re-enter the BCom program.

    Note: all students who enter/re-enter the BCom program must follow the requirements of the program in place at the time of entry/re-entry. Some programs may have limited entry.

    Continuing BCom students. Students who have completed less than 90 passed credits and maintain a cumulative grade point average of at least 5.00 may proceed in good standing in the 90-credit or Honours BCom degree. Students who have completed 90 passed credits but less than 120 passed credits with a cumulative and major average of 5.00 may apply to graduate or have the option to proceed in Honours.

    Courses taken beyond the normal maximum. Students in the bachelor program who successfully complete (pass) more than 90 credits and whose cumulative and major grade point average is at least 5.00 will have all credits counted towards their degree and their cumulative grade point average.

    Graduating with a BCom degree. Students must successfully complete (pass) at least 90 credits which meet the Faculty’s degree and program requirements, with a cumulative and major grade point average of at least 5.00.

    Failure to maintain minimum BCom standing (advising recommended). Students who have completed less than 90 passed credits whose cumulative grade point average is below 5.00 will be placed on “program warning”, provided they meet the program warning conditions. Please refer to the Academic Warnings and Penalties section.

    Additional credits to raise grade point average for graduation. BCom students who upon completion of 90 passed credits whose cumulative and major grade point average is below 5.00 will be allowed a maximum of 12 attempted credits beyond the 90 passed credits in an effort to raise their cumulative and major grade point average to the minimum of 5.00 to continue or graduate with the bachelor degree. New courses, repeated courses, passed courses and failed courses will count towards the total maximum number of attempted credits. These courses must be taken at York University.

    Students who have 90 passed credits and have attempted 12 credits beyond the 90, who fail to attain the minimum cumulative and major grade point average of 5.00 will be ineligible to continue or graduate in BCom.

    Bachelor of Disaster and Emergency Management (Honours BDEM) Degree (120 Credits)

    Entry. Students prior to entering Honours BDEM are required to have one high school 4U mathematics courses which must be MHF4U (Advanced Functions) or the equivalent. Students with less than 90 passed credits completed require a minimum cumulative grade point average of 5.00. At the point of completing 90 passed credits students who have not attained the minimum cumulative and major grade point average of 5.00 will be ineligible to enter/re-enter the program. No extra courses may be taken in a subsequent session in an effort to raise the grade point average to enter/re-enter the BDEM program. Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies students may submit a Program Change Request, available on the Program Change web page at http://myacademicrecord.students.yorku.ca/program-change, to enter/re-enter the Honours BDEM program.

    Note: all students who enter/re-enter the Honours BDEM program must follow the requirements of the program in place at the time of entry/re-entry. Some programs may have limited entry.

    Continuing Honours BDEM students. Students who have completed less than 90 passed credits and maintain a cumulative grade point average of at least 5.00 may proceed in good standing in the Honours BDEM degree. Students who have completed 90 passed credits with a cumulative and major average of at least 5.00 and have less than 120 passed credits may proceed in Honours.

    Students who have completed at least 120 passed credits that have a minimum cumulative grade point average of at least 5.00 and a major grade point average of at least 5.50 may continue in Honours, if program requirements are not met, or may apply to graduate.

    Graduating with an Honours BDEM degree. Students must successfully complete (pass) at least 120 credits which meet the Faculty’s degree and program requirements with a cumulative grade point average of at least 5.00 and a major grade point average of at least 5.50.

    Courses taken beyond the normal maximum. Students who have completed 120 credits or greater who have a minimum cumulative grade point average of 5.00 and a major grade point average of 5.50 will have all credits counted towards their Honours and their cumulative grade point average.

    Failure to maintain minimum Honours BDEM standing (advising recommended). Students who have completed less than 90 passed credits whose cumulative grade point average is below 5.00 will be placed on “program warning” and may continue in the 90 credit BDEM degree only, provided they meet the program warning conditions. Please refer to the Academic Warnings and Penalties section.

    Opting to graduate with a BDEM degree (90 credits). Students who are eligible for Honours may opt to graduate in a BDEM program in the session in which they have completed their final course(s).

    Bachelor of Disaster and Emergency Management (BDEM) Degree (90 Credits)

    Entry. Students prior to entering BDEM are required to have one high school 4U mathematics courses which must be MHF4U (Advanced Functions) or the equivalent. Students with less than 90 passed credits completed require a minimum cumulative grade point average of 5.00. At the point of completing 90 passed credits students who have not attained the minimum cumulative and major grade point average of 5.00 will be ineligible to enter/re-enter the program. No extra courses may be taken in a subsequent session in an effort to raise the grade point average to enter/re-enter the BDEM program. Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies students may submit a Program Change Request, available on the Program Change web page at http://myacademicrecord.students.yorku.ca/program-change, to enter/re-enter the BDEM program.

    Note: all students who enter/re-enter the BDEM program must follow the requirements of the program in place at the time of entry/re-entry. Some programs may have limited entry.

    Continuing BDEM students. Students who have completed less than 90 passed credits and maintain a cumulative grade point average of at least 5.00 may proceed in good standing in the 90-credit or Honours BDEM degree. Students who have completed 90 passed credits with a cumulative and major average of 5.00 and have less than 120 passed credits may apply to graduate or have the option to proceed in Honours.

    Courses taken beyond the normal maximum. Students in the bachelor program who successfully complete (pass) more than 90 credits and whose cumulative and major grade point average is at least 5.00 will have all credits counted towards their degree and their cumulative grade point average.

    Graduating with a BDEM degree. Students must successfully complete (pass) at least 90 credits which meet the Faculty’s degree and program requirements, with a cumulative and major grade point average of at least 5.00.

    Failure to maintain minimum BDEM standing (advising recommended). Students who have completed less than 90 passed credits whose cumulative grade point average is below 5.00 will be placed on “program warning”, provided they meet the program warning conditions. Please refer to the Academic Warnings and Penalties section.

    Additional credits to raise grade point average for graduation. BDEM students who upon completion of 90 passed credits whose cumulative and major grade point average is below 5.00 will be allowed a maximum of 12 attempted credits beyond the 90 passed credits in an effort to raise their cumulative and major grade point average to the minimum of 5.00 to continue or graduate with the bachelor degree. New courses, repeated courses, passed courses and failed courses will count towards the total maximum number of attempted credits. These courses must be taken at York University.

    Students who have 90 passed credits and have attempted 12 credits beyond the 90, who fail to attain the minimum cumulative and major grade point average of 5.00 will be ineligible to continue or graduate in BDEM.

    Bachelor of Human Resources Management (Honours BHRM) Degree (120 Credits)

    Entry. Students prior to entering the Honours BHRM must have completed one 4U mathematics course or equivalent. Students with less than 90 passed credits completed require a minimum cumulative grade point average of 5.00. At the point of completing 90 passed credits students who have not attained the minimum cumulative and major grade point average of 5.00 will be ineligible to enter/re-enter the program. No courses may be taken in a subsequent session in an effort to raise the grade point average to enter/re-enter the Honours BHRM program. Liberal Arts and Professional Studies students may submit a Program Change Request, available on the Program Change web page at http://myacademicrecord.students.yorku.ca/program-change, to enter the Honours BHRM.

    Note: all students who enter/re-enter the Honours BHRM program must follow the requirements of the program in place at the time of entry/re-entry. Some programs may have limited entry.

    Continuing Honours BHRM students. Students who have completed less than 90 passed credits and maintain a cumulative grade point average of at least 5.00 may proceed in good standing in the Honours BHRM degree. Students who have completed 90 passed credits with a cumulative and major average of 5.00 and have less than 120 passed credits may proceed in Honours.

    Students who have completed 120 passed credits or greater who have a minimum cumulative grade point average of 5.00 and a major grade point average of 5.50 may continue in Honours if program requirements are not met or may apply to graduate.

    Courses taken beyond the normal maximum. Students who have completed 120 credits or greater who have a minimum cumulative grade point average of 5.00 and a major grade point average of 5.50 will have all credits counted towards their Honours and their cumulative grade point average.

    Graduating with an Honours BHRM degree. Students must successfully complete (pass) at least 120 credits which meet the Faculty’s degree and program requirements with a cumulative grade point average of at least 5.00 and a major grade point average of at least 5.50.

    Failure to maintain minimum Honours BHRM standing (advising recommended). Students who have completed less than 90 passed credits whose cumulative grade point average is below 5.00 will be placed on “program warning” and may continue in the 90 credit BHRM degree only. Please refer to the Academic Warnings and Penalties section.

    Opting to graduate with a BHRM degree (90 credits). Students who are eligible for Honours may opt to graduate in a BHRM program in the session in which they have completed their final course(s).

    Bachelor of Human Resources Management (BHRM) Degree (90 Credits)

    Entry. Students prior to entering the BHRM must have completed one 4U mathematics course or equivalent. Students with less than 90 passed credits completed require a minimum cumulative grade point average of 5.00. At the point of completing 90 passed credits students who have not attained the minimum cumulative and major grade point average of 5.00 will be ineligible to enter/re-enter the program. No extra courses may be taken in a subsequent session in an effort to raise the grade point average to enter/re-enter the BHRM program. Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies students may submit a Program Change Request, available on the Program Change web page at http://myacademicrecord.students.yorku.ca/program-change, to enter the BHRM.

    Note: all students who enter/re-enter the BHRM program must follow the requirements of the program in place at the time of entry/re-entry. Some programs may have limited entry.

    Faculty transfers. Students from other Faculties may submit a Program Change Request, available on the Program Change web page at http://myacademicrecord.students.yorku.ca/program-change, to enter the BHRM program.

    Continuing BHRM students. Students who have completed less than 90 passed credits and maintain a cumulative grade point average of at least 5.00 may proceed in good standing in the 90-credit or Honours BHRM degree. Students who have completed 90 passed credits with a cumulative and major average of 5.00 may apply to graduate or have the option to proceed in Honours.

    Courses taken beyond the normal maximum. Students in the bachelor program who successfully complete (pass) more than 90 credits and whose cumulative and major grade point average is at least 5.00 will have all credits counted towards their degree and their cumulative grade point average.

    Graduating with a BHRM degree. Students must successfully complete (pass) at least 90 credits which meet the Faculty’s degree and program requirements, with a cumulative and major grade point average of at least 5.00.

    Failure to maintain minimum BHRM standing (advising recommended). Students who have completed less than 90 passed credits whose cumulative grade point average is below 5.00 will be placed on “program warning”, provided they meet the program warning conditions. Please refer to the Academic Warnings and Penalties section.

    Additional credits to raise grade point average for graduation. BHRM students who upon completion of 90 passed credits whose cumulative and major grade point average is below 5.00 will be allowed a maximum of 12 attempted credits beyond the 90 passed credits in an effort to raise their cumulative and major grade point average to the minimum of 5.00 to continue or graduate with the BHRM degree. New, repeated, passed and failed courses will count towards the total maximum number of attempted credits. These courses must be taken at York University.

    Students who have 90 passed credits and have attempted 12 credits beyond the 90th credit, who fail to attain the minimum cumulative and major grade point average of 5.00 will be ineligible to continue or graduate in BHRM.

    Bachelor of Public Administration (Honours BPA) Degree (120 Credits)

    Entry. Students prior to entering the Honours BPA must have completed one 4U mathematics course or equivalent. Students with less than 90 passed credits completed require a minimum cumulative grade point average of 5.00. At the point of completing 90 passed credits students who have not attained the minimum cumulative and major grade point average of 5.00 will be ineligible to enter/re-enter the program. No courses may be taken in a subsequent session in an effort to raise the grade point average to enter/re-enter the Honours BPA program. Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies students may submit a Program Change Request, available on the Program Change web page at http://myacademicrecord.students.yorku.ca/program-change, to enter/re-enter the Honours BPA.

    Note: all students who enter/re-enter the Honours BPA program must follow the requirements of the program in place at the time of entry/re-entry. Some programs may have limited entry.

    Continuing Honours BPA students. Students who have completed less than 90 passed credits and maintain a cumulative grade point average of at least 5.00 may proceed in good standing in the Honours BPA degree. Students who have completed 90 passed credits with a cumulative average of 5.00 and have less than 120 passed credits may proceed in Honours.

    Students who have completed 120 passed credits or greater who have a minimum cumulative grade point average of 5.00 may continue in Honours if program requirements are not met, or may apply to graduate.

    Courses taken beyond the normal maximum. Students who have completed 120 credits or greater who have a minimum cumulative grade point average of 5.00 will have all credits counted towards their Honours and their cumulative grade point average.

    Graduating with an Honours BPA degree. Students must successfully complete (pass) at least 120 credits which meet the Faculty’s degree and program requirements with a cumulative grade point average of at least 5.00.

    Failure to maintain minimum Honours BPA standing. Students who have completed less than 90 passed credits whose cumulative grade point average is below 5.00 will be placed on “program warning”, provided they meet the program warning conditions. Please refer to the Academic Warnings and Penalties section.

    Additional credits to raise grade point average for graduation. BPA students who upon completion of 90 passed credits have a cumulative grade point average below 5.00 will be allowed a maximum of 12 attempted credits beyond the 90 passed credits in an effort to raise their cumulative grade point average to a minimum of 5.00 to continue. New courses, repeated courses, passed courses and failed courses will count towards the total maximum number of attempted credits. These courses must be taken at York University.

    Students who have 90 passed credits and have attempted 12 credits beyond the 90, who fail to attain the minimum cumulative grade point averages of 5.00 will be ineligible to continue or graduate in BPA.

    Bachelor of Social Work (Honours BSW) Degree (120 Credits)

    Entry. Students may enter/re-enter prior to the completion of 90 credits. Some programs may have limited entry and/or further entry requirements. Students who are ineligible to continue in Honours may re-enter Honours if they raise their cumulative grade point average to 5.00 (C+) or above by the time they have successfully completed their 90th credit.

    Students may enter/re-enter Honours BSW if they meet the minimum Honours progression requirement. Students who have not attained the 5.00 cumulative grade point average at the point of completing 90 passed credits will be ineligible for Honours. No extra courses may be taken in a subsequent session in an effort to raise the grade point average to qualify for Honours. Please refer to Academic Warnings and Penalties section.

    All requests for entry require a supplemental application form and are subject to School of Social Work approval. All requests for re-entry do not require a supplemental application form and are subject to the School of Social Work approval. Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies students may submit a Program Change Request, available on the Program Change web page at http://myacademicrecord.students.yorku.ca/program-change, to enter/re-enter the Honours BSW.

    Note: all students who enter/re-enter the Honours BSW program must follow the requirements of the program in place at the time of entry/re-entry. Some programs may have limited entry.

    Faculty transfers. Students from other Faculties may submit a Program Change Request, available on the Program Change web page at http://myacademicrecord.students.yorku.ca/program-change and a supplemental application, to enter the Honours BSW program. All requests are subject to School of Social Work approval.

    Continuing. To continue in the Honours BSW Honours program, students must maintain a cumulative grade point average of at least 5.00. Students whose cumulative grade point average falls below 5.00 during the course of their studies may proceed in an Honours program, on warning, provided they meet the year level progression requirements described below.

    Honours standing grade point average requirement (BSW). Students who have completed less than 84 earned credits whose cumulative grade point average is below 5.00 may continue in Honours provided they meet the minimum year level progression requirements as follows:

    Year Level Earned Credits Minimum cumulative grade point average
    1
    0-23
    4.00
    2
    24-53
    4.25
    3
    54-83
    4.80
    4
    84 and above
    5.00

    Note: year level is based on the number of earned credits including transfer credit.

    Courses taken beyond the normal maximum. Students in an Honours program who successfully complete (pass) more than 120 credits and whose cumulative grade point average is at least 5.00 will have all credits counted towards their Honours and their cumulative grade point average.

    Failure to maintain honours progression for Honours BSW degree. BSW students who fail to meet the Honours progression requirement will be ineligible to proceed in the BSW program. Students who have completed less than 90 passed credits and wish to continue their studies must change their degree. Program Change Request is available on the Program Change web page at http://myacademicrecord.students.yorku.ca/program-change. Students who have completed 90 passed credits but less than 120 passed credits may petition for an Honours waiver. No extra courses may be taken in a subsequent session in an effort to raise the grade point average to qualify for Honours. Please refer to the Academic Warnings and Penalties section.

    Graduating with an Honours BSW degree. Students must successfully complete (pass) at least 120 credits which meet the Faculty’s degree and program requirements with a cumulative grade point average of at least 5.00 including a minimum grade of C (4.00) in all courses used in the major.

    For information on certificates, please refer to Certificate Regulations.

  • Rules and Regulations
  • For a comprehensive listing of University policies and procedures refer to the Undergraduate Calendar Section on Policies and Regulations and visit http://secretariat-policies.info.yorku.ca.

    Transfer Students

    Students who enter with prior experience at a postsecondary educational institution are enrolled in an Honours program if their prior cumulative grade point average (including failed courses) is at least the equivalent of 5.00 on the York scale. (Note: courses taken at other postsecondary institutions are not calculated as part of the student’s grade point average at York, nor do they appear on the York transcript.)

    Academic Standing Requirements for Visiting Students

    Individuals who wish to enrol in undergraduate credit courses, but who do not intend to complete a degree or a certificate may be admitted to York as a visiting student (refer to the Admissions section for more information). There are three categories of visiting students:

    1. Those who hold an undergraduate degree (three-year bachelor's degree minimum) from an accredited university/university-level institution;
    2. Those who do not hold an undergraduate degree but wish to enrol in York courses to fulfill the academic, upgrading or professional development requirements of a professional designation;
    3. Those who are currently attending another recognized university and wish to take York courses on a letter of permission issued by their home institution.

    Repeated course legislation does not apply to visiting students but only to academic degrees and certificates. Therefore, all courses attempted or taken will count in the overall cumulative grade point average.

    GPA Requirement

    Students in categories a) and b) whose overall cumulative grade point average falls below 4.00 on at least 24 credits attempted will not be allowed to enrol in any subsequent session as visiting students. Students who are not permitted to re-enrol must apply for re-admission through the Admissions Office.

    Credit Limits

    Students in category b) who have maintained an overall cumulative grade point average of 4.00 throughout their studies and who have completed 30 credits will not be allowed to enrol in subsequent sessions and must either reactivate to proceed as visiting students or may choose to apply for admission to a degree or certificate program.

    Visiting students admitted to the Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies may:

    1. enrol in degree credit courses providing they meet the published corequisite(s) and prerequisite(s), or obtain permission of the Chair of the discipline concerned;
    2. not register in a course equivalent to one already completed.

    Faculty Transfers

    Students who were last registered in an undergraduate degree program in another Faculty of York University and who wish to transfer to the Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies must submit a Program Change Request, available on the Program Change Web page at http://www.registrar.yorku.ca/program/change. Refer to the Academic Standing section for degree/program academic standing requirements.

    Information for Continuing Students in a Grandparented Program

    Students who were registered in a degree and program formerly in the Atkinson Faculty of Liberal and Professional Studies or the Faculty of Arts have been moved to the Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies. Grandparenting provisions have been developed for students continuing in these degrees and programs.

    Grandparented rules allow students to complete their studies following the rules of the programs they were in prior to the Fall/Winter 2009-2010 Session. This includes all major and degree requirements including general education requirements and upper level requirements, as well as the electives or required credits outside the major. For more information on the grandparenting rules visit http://www.yorku.ca/laps/transition/faqs/grandparented.html.

    Second or Subsequent Degrees

    Students who hold an undergraduate degree from an accredited institution, and who are admissible according to Faculty and University policies, may pursue a second (or subsequent) degree program in the Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies.

    Eligibility for admission and standing will be assessed according to performance in the first or subsequent degree(s). Students will be assessed as eligible for an Honours degree if they have graduated with Honours standing in their first degree. Students who are eligible for an Honours degree program will be enrolled in Honours, but may elect to graduate with a bachelor’s degree. Students admitted to an Honours degree and 90-credit bachelor program will be granted transfer credit in accordance with the University’s residency requirement. Under certain circumstances, students admitted to a 90-credit bachelor’s degree program may qualify to proceed in an Honours degree; however, the transfer credit granted upon admission will not be amended.

    All second (and subsequent) degree candidates must meet the residency requirements and must satisfy all upper-level requirements and requirements in the major/minor subject(s). Grade point averages are calculated for students in second (or subsequent) degree programs only on the courses taken for that degree and not on courses taken to satisfy requirements for the first or subsequent degree(s).

    Students must apply through Admissions for second and subsequent undergraduate degree(s). University residency requirements apply.

    Course Loads

    Fall/Winter Session

    A full course load is defined as 30 credits during the fall/winter session. Students may take a maximum of 36 credits overall (and 18 credits per term) without petitioning. Students with substantial familial or financial responsibilities outside the University are advised to consider taking fewer courses in a session. It is recommended that students take their personal circumstances and academic standing into consideration before taking a course load of 36 credits in the fall/winter session.

    Summer Session

    A full course load is defined as 15 credits in the summer session. Students may take a maximum of 18 credits overall without petitioning. Students with substantial familial or financial responsibilities outside the University are advised to consider taking fewer courses in a session. It is recommended that students take their personal circumstances and academic standing into consideration before taking a course load of 18 credits in the summer session.

    Courses Taken at York University

    Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies degree candidates may enrol in courses offered by other York University Faculties provided they meet the publicized corequisite(s) and/or prerequisite(s). Students are responsible for ensuring that out-of-Faculty courses meet Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies degree and program requirements. Out-of-Faculty courses are credited at the level at which they are taken.

    York University courses are also offered in Italy by the Department of Languages, Literatures and Linguistics. In addition, independent study, directed reading and thesis courses are offered by some departments/schools. Students interested in arranging such courses should inquire at the relevant department/school. Individual programs may place restrictions on the number and nature of courses taken.

    Cross-listed Courses

    Some courses in the Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies are cross-listed. Cross-listed courses are offered jointly by two or more teaching units (such as departments or divisions), or teaching units in two or more different Faculties. Regardless of the offering Faculty or discipline identified by the course prefix of a cross-listed course, every offered section of a cross-listed course is substantially the same as every other and all are therefore recognized as instances of the “same” course.

    1. Cross-listed courses may not be double counted in order to fulfill degree requirements.
    2. Cross-listed courses may not be used to fulfill degree requirements of credits required outside the major in the programs offering the cross-listing.

    Letters of Permission (LOP) - Taking Courses at another University

    If you wish to enrol at another university (host) and have credits completed there transferred toward your York degree/certificate, you must first request a letter of permission (LOP) and receive approval from the Registrar's Office. While you are pursuing your York degree/certificate, transfer credit will not be granted for work completed at another university without the LOP. Further information is available on the Letters of Permission Web page at http://www.registrar.yorku.ca/enrol/lop.

    Eligibility

    • To be eligible for an LOP you must be pursuing a York degree and/or a certificate program.
    • You must be in good academic standing.

    Ineligibility

    You are ineligible for LOP consideration:

    • If you are a non-degree student at York (you may apply directly to the host without an LOP).
    • An LOP will not be issued if you are on academic warning, program warning, debarment warning or academic probation.
    • If your academic status changes after the LOP is issued and you are no longer in good standing or are ineligible to proceed in your program, the LOP will be rescinded and you will no longer be eligible for transfer credit from the host regardless of the grade achieved there.
    • If you enrol in courses at the host other than those listed on the LOP, you will not receive transfer credit upon completion unless the Registrar's Office amends your LOP in advance.
    • Your LOP will not be processed if there are outstanding debts on your University account.

    Students' Responsibilities

    It is your responsibility to ensure that:

    • You complete the Letter of Permission form and submit it along with detailed calendar course descriptions from the host institution to the Faculty/school/department best able to identify any York-based course credit exclusions or substitutes.
    • Submit the completed form, along with the $50 non-refundable processing fee, to the Registrar's Office drop-box in the lobby of the Bennett Centre for Student Services. Approved LOPs will be sent to the host university and a copy sent to you for your records. Incomplete applications for an LOP cannot be processed and will be returned to you.
    • Courses completed on an LOP meet your program requirements.
    • Once you have been issued the LOP, it should be presented to the host institution's Admission Office. The host governs admission and application deadlines for students applying on an LOP.
    • Should your enrolment/registration circumstances change; that is, the courses(s) you are requesting on an LOP is (are) not available, you must immediately contact the Faculty in order to request approval for any replacement courses. Obtain departmental approval for these changes, then notify the Registrar’s Office at lop@yorku.ca of any enrolment changes as soon as they are made.
    • An official transcript is forwarded to the Registrar’s Office at York University as soon as final grades are available from the host institution, refer to the deadline dates on the Letter of Permission Web page (http://www.registrar.yorku.ca/enrol/lop) under the Instructions and Application tab.
    • If you do not register or complete any of the courses for which you were issued the LOP, you must provide the Registrar’s Office with documentation from the host declaring you either did not enrol/register or that you withdrew from the course(s) without any academic penalty.

    Important Notes

    • Maximum number of credits you may enrol/register in an academic session including courses taken on an LOP, is 18 credits in summer or 36 credits in fall/winter (18 credits per term).
    • You must obtain a minimum grade of C (as understood in the Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies) for credit to be granted.
    • Course credit exclusions (CCEs) are courses offered at York and the host institution that are similar enough in content that both may not be taken for degree credit. A course substitute can replace a specific York course/degree requirement. A course substitute can be a CCE but a CCE is not always a course substitute.
    • Some York programs are subject to external accreditation or professional association requirements (e.g. practica and core courses for engineering, nursing or social work), which restrict approvals for LOPs. Please consult your Faculty school/department for details.
    • Credit towards your degree will only be counted once for repeated courses taken at York or elsewhere. Should you repeat a course the initial grade will be replaced with the notation of “NCR-No Credit Retained”.
    • Generic results of “Pass” or “Credit Achieved” at the host will not be accepted for transfer credit to your York degree.
    • Transfer credit will be assessed based on the course work/requirements including in-class hours completed at the host institution and not on the course work/requirements of the York credit exclusion or substitute.
    • Courses and grades achieved at the host are not listed on your York transcript or included in your York grade point average(s).

    Audit a Course

    With the permission of a course director, an auditor attends classes and participates in a course in the same way as other students, but does not submit assignments or write tests or examinations. Restrictions may apply. Further information about admissibility, application procedures, courses available and fees may be obtained at Registrarial Services.

    Directed Reading Courses

    Students who are pursuing directed reading courses may do so after having successfully completed (passed) 24 credits in the Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies. The Faculty provides for such independent reading courses which are subject to the guidelines of the departments and schools, and to the following regulations:

    • The maximum permissible number of directed reading courses depends on a student’s degree option and availability.
    • Students in Honours programs may take 24 credits; students in a bachelors program may take 18 credits.
    • Within their last 30 credits, students may take a maximum of 12 credits in directed reading courses.
    • Students may take a maximum of 12 credits of directed reading courses with the same faculty member.
  • Term Work, Tests and Examinations
  • Term Work

    Term work includes reports, assignments, presentations, essays, tests and other written work assigned in a course with the exception of final examinations.

    Deadline for Submission

    Term work must be submitted by the first day of the official examination period of the term in which the course ends. Instructors, departments and schools may, however, set earlier deadlines for the submission of term work.

    Tests and Examinations

    Tests and examinations are important parts of the educational process. They must be conducted under fair conditions which allow students to demonstrate what they have learned. Disruptions or attempts to obtain an unfair advantage are offences against academic process and carry severe penalties. (Refer to Senate Policy on Academic Honesty and Student Code of Conduct at http://secretariat-policies.info.yorku.ca/.) The following regulations apply to tests and examinations. (http://secretariat-policies.info.yorku.ca/policies/conduct-of-examinations-policy-guidelines/)

    Identification

    Students who are being tested or examined are required to present a valid York University photo identification card or other acceptable form of photo identification and to sign the attendance roster for the examination.

    Answer Booklets

    Answer booklets are the property of the University. Test papers, examination booklets and other answer forms remain the property of the University unless they are released by an instructor. Students may not remove them from the test or examination room without permission; nor may they possess blank examination booklets.

    Students’ Right to Review

    Students may always have the opportunity, under properly controlled conditions, to review and discuss their graded test and examination answers, but final examination answer booklets (and at the discretion of the course director, other examination booklets) remain the property of the University, and are retained by the teaching unit for a certain period of time before they are destroyed.

    Tests and Examinations during the Term

    Restriction at End of Term

    No examinations or tests collectively worth more than 20 per cent of the final grade in a course will be given during the final 14 calendar days of classes in a term. The exceptions to the rule are classes which regularly meet Friday evenings or on Saturday and/or Sunday at any time, and courses offered in the compressed summer terms.

    Scheduling of Tests

    Except where testing is conducted during individual appointments which accommodate the schedules of students (e.g. individual oral interviews in language courses, individually scheduled make-up tests), tests or examinations given during the term should be held within the hours regularly scheduled for the course in question. Any exceptions must be communicated within the first two weeks of classes and on the course outline.

    Students’ Right of Refusal

    Students who are asked to write tests or examinations in contravention of the preceding two regulations may refuse to do so without academic penalty; they also have the right to raise the matter with the Chair/director of the department or the school in which the course is offered or with the dean.

    Formally Scheduled Examinations

    Final Examination Period

    There is a final examination period at the end of each term. The dates and times of formally scheduled examinations are listed on the York Courses website at https://w2prod.sis.yorku.ca/Apps/WebObjects/cdm.woa/wa/curexam. Examinations may last two or three hours.

    Religious Accommodation Guidelines

    Students who, because of religious commitment cannot write a formally scheduled examination (December and April examination periods) on the date scheduled, should contact the course instructor no later than three weeks prior to the start of the examination period to arrange an alternative examination date. A Religious Accommodation form is available for this purpose online at https://w2prod.sis.yorku.ca/Apps/WebObjects/cdm.woa/wa/regobs.

    Exam Accommodation

    Students with disabilities requiring accommodation or students requiring accommodation for significant religious observances shall be responsible for requesting the necessary accommodation in advance of the examination period and in accordance with the recommended timelines in the relevant policies and procedures.

    Rewriting of Examinations

    The Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies has no provision for the rewriting of a final examination to improve a mark.

    Missed Examinations

    In accordance with University policy and procedure, a student who misses an examination should contact the course director and the department/school of the examination as soon as possible. A student who wishes to write a make-up examination must request deferred standing in the course. Please refer to the section on Deferred Standing/Academic Petitions and Appeals or the Deferred Standing web page at http://www.registrar.yorku.ca/exams/deferred.

  • Grading in Courses
  • Grading

    1. All course grades, including those assigned after a deferred examination(s) are derived from an evaluation of examination and term work, unless otherwise decided.
    2. With the exception of courses explicitly required for certification by a professional body, or other exceptions agreed to by Senate, students pass or fail a course on the basis of final course average, without the additional requirement of having to obtain a passing grade on a final examination. (This does not preclude the possibility of a final examination representing more than 50 per cent of the final grade in a particular course or the requirement that a student pass a specific course lab component.)
    3. Unless Senate agrees to explicit exemptions, eligibility to proceed in or graduate from an undergraduate degree program will not be based on a minimum grade requirement for each major course. It should be noted that this does not preclude setting requirements for a minimum cumulative grade point average in a major subject area. Nor does this preclude setting individual course grade requirements when a course is a prerequisite for upper-level courses or as part of a core requirement. Course grades are not official until released by the University.
    4. The letter-grade system is the fundamental system of assessment of performance in undergraduate programs at York University. In courses where percentages are used as a means of reporting grades on individual pieces of work, the following conversion table is to be used in converting percentage grades to letter grades, unless alternative provisions for scaling and/or conversion are announced to students in writing within the first two weeks of classes.
    From Percentage To Letter Grade Grade Point
    90-100 A+ 9
    80-89 A 8
    75-79 B+ 7
    70-74 B 6
    65-69 C+ 5
    60-64 C 4
    55-59 D+ 3
    50-54 D 2
    40-49 E 1
    0-39 F 0

    Repeating passed or failed courses for academic credit:

    Students may repeat a passed or failed course twice for academic degree or certificate credit, for a maximum of three (3) attempts at a course. Students should note that course availability and space considerations may preclude the possibility of repeating a course in the session they choose.

    Credit towards your degree will only be counted once for repeated courses taken at York or elsewhere. All repeated passed or failed attempts are subject to the University "Policy on Repeating Passed or Failed Courses For Academic Credit".

    Pass/Fail grading option:

    The Faculty wants capable upper-year students to feel free to enrol in free-choice courses without fear of jeopardizing their grade point average. For this reason, students may take a limited number of such courses for full degree credit on an ungraded basis. Courses taken on this basis are listed on the transcript as either P (pass) or F (fail). Neither of these two grades is calculated into the student’s grade point averages. Pass credits are added into the total number of credits earned and credits taken. Fail credits are added into the total number of credits failed and credits taken. The following regulations apply to courses taken as a pass/fail alternative grading option.

    Students in good standing who have completed a minimum of 24 credits towards an undergraduate degree program may elect to take up to six credits on an ungraded basis toward a bachelors degree (90 credits) or 12 credits toward an Honours bachelors degree (120 credits). The pass/fail grading option cannot be chosen by a student for the following:

    • major or minor courses (including for-credit practica);
    • outside the major required courses;
    • courses taken to satisfy general education or certificate requirements;
    • required 1000-level science courses for students in the Faculties of Health, Science and Engineering.

    Students must confirm their eligibility to complete a course on an ungraded basis. Completed Pass/Fail Application forms must be submitted to the relevant office within the first two weeks of class. The completed form should then be returned to Registrarial Services.

    Students who elect to complete a course on an ungraded basis may not revert to taking the course on a graded basis after the last date to drop a course without academic penalty.

    The form to request the pass/fail grading option is available on the Pass/Fail Option Web page at http://www.registrar.yorku.ca/enrol/passfail.

    Exceptions

    The pass/fail grading option is not applicable for the following:

    • graduate degrees or diplomas;
    • BEd and BEd (Technological Education) degrees;
    • LLB/JD degree;
    • BBA and iBBA degrees;
    • exchange courses taken at another institution.

    Credit/No Credit

    The notations Credit and No Credit will be used when an entire course is being offered on an ungraded basis. No Credit will count as an earned failing grade of F in the grade point average.

    Grading Scheme

    The course grading scheme (i.e. kinds and weights of assignments, essays, exams etc.) is to be announced, and be available in writing, within the first two weeks of classes.

    Under normal circumstances, graded feedback worth at least 15 per cent of the final grade for fall, winter or summer term, and 30 per cent for full year courses offered in the fall/winter session, will be received by students in all courses prior to the final withdrawal date from a course without receiving a grade, with the following exceptions:

    • graduate or upper-level undergraduate courses where course work typically, or at the instructor’s discretion, consists of a single piece of work and/or is based predominantly (or solely) on student presentations (e.g. honours theses or graduate research papers not due by the drop date etc.);
    • practicum courses;
    • ungraded courses;
    • courses in Faculties where the drop date occurs within the first three weeks of classes;
    • courses which run on a compressed schedule (a course which accomplishes its academic credits of work at a rate of more than one credit hour per two calendar weeks or faster).

    Note: under unusual and/or unforeseeable circumstances which disrupt the academic norm, instructors are expected to provide grading schemes and academic feedback in the spirit of these regulations, as soon as possible. Information on other policies related to grades is available from Faculties, departments and schools and the University Secretariat (http://secretariat-policies.info.yorku.ca).

    Subsequent Changes

    In exceptional circumstances, a previously announced marking scheme for a course may be changed, but only with the unanimous consent of students; the new marking scheme must also be distributed in written form.

    In courses where percentages are used as a means of reporting grades on individual pieces of work, the conversion table is used in converting percentage grades to letter grades, unless alternative provisions for scaling and/or conversion are announced to students in writing within the first two weeks of classes.

    Grade Reappraisals

    Please refer to the Policies and Regulations section of the Undergraduate Calendar for further information about grade reappraisals.

    Students may, with sufficient academic grounds, request that a final grade in a course be reappraised (which may mean the review of specific pieces of tangible work). Non-academic grounds are not relevant for grade reappraisals; in such cases, students are advised to petition to their home Faculty. Students are normally expected to first contact the course director to discuss the grade received and to request that their tangible work be reviewed. Tangible work may include written, graphic, digitized, modelled, video recording or audio recording formats, but not oral work.

    Students need to be aware that a request for a grade reappraisal may result in the original grade being raised, lowered or confirmed.

    In the event that students are still not satisfied with the final grade or the course director is not available to review the work, they may submit in writing a formal request for a grade reappraisal to the school/department or unit in which the course is offered. The Senate approved deadline for submitting grade reappraisals is February 15 for fall term grades, June 15 for fall/winter session and winter term grades, September 30 for summer session grades or a minimum of 21 days from the release of grades, whichever is later. When a submission deadline occurs on a weekend or holiday, requests will be accepted up until the end of the next available business day. Exercising discretion about minor delays in meeting the deadline which result from slow mail delivery or extraordinary circumstances is reasonable.

    Grade Reappraisal Appeal

    Students may appeal a negative decision on a request for a reappraisal or the result of the reappraisal itself to a Faculty-level appeals committee in the Faculty in which the course is offered only on the ground of procedural irregularity.

  • Deferred Standing, Academic Petitions and Appeals
  • Please refer to the Policies and Regulations section of the Undergraduate Calendar for further information about deferred standing, academic petitions and appeal guidelines.

    Deferred Standing

    What is deferred standing?

    Deferred standing may be granted to undergraduate students who are unable to write their final examination at the scheduled time or to submit their course work by the published deadline for the submission of term work.  In order to apply for deferred standing, students must complete a Final Exam/Assignment Deferred Standing Agreement Form (available at http://www.registrar.yorku.ca/exams/deferred) and reach an agreement directly with the course director for an alternate final examination date or for an extension to the deadline. The Final Exam/Assignment Deferred Standing Agreement Form facilitates the setting of an alternate date for writing a final examination or submitting outstanding course work before the Faculty deadlines (http://www.registrar.yorku.ca/exams/deferred). There is no provision for rewriting a final examination to improve a final grade.

    Note: When students do not or cannot write a mid-term examination (not held during the formal examination period), alternate arrangements to write the mid-term examination should be made within the duration of the course by the course director and individual student at the discretion of the course director. The Deferred Standing Agreement does not apply.

    What about religious accommodation for a final exam?

    Because of religious commitment, students who cannot write a formally scheduled final examination on the date scheduled should refer to the appropriate guidelines regarding the Religious Observance Policy and Accommodation Guidelines at https://w2prod.sis.yorku.ca/Apps/WebObjects/cdm.woa/wa/regobs.

    How are deferred standings arranged?

    Students must make a formal request for deferred standing. This is done by approaching their course director with the printed Final Exam/Assignment Deferred Standing Agreement form to discuss the possibility of setting an alternate date for writing a final examination or for submitting outstanding course work. Students must also supply all relevant supporting documentation (as outlined on the form). Photocopies of supporting documentation are acceptable as long as the course director is able to view the original documents.  It is Senate policy that “normally, requests for deferred standing must be communicated within one week following a missed examination or the last day to submit course work.”

    If an instructor does not approve a request for deferred standing, students have the option of filing an academic petition. See: http://laps.yorku.ca/office-of-the-faculty-council/undergraduate-academic-petitions/.

    Deferred standing petitions must be submitted no later than two weeks after the formal exam period has ended (final exam) or two weeks from the published deadline for the submission of term work (as concerns term tests, essays and other written term work due at the end of the term of study).

    Aegrotat Standing

    In cases where a student cannot be expected to complete the work for a course, the phrase “aegrotat standing” (from the Latin for “she/he is ill”) is substituted for a grade on the transcript. Aegrotat standing is seldom granted, and only in exceptional circumstances where deferred standing or late withdrawal from the course is inappropriate.

    Academic Petitions

    The purpose of academic regulations is to allow students to develop their interests and talents to the fullest in ways consistent with the philosophy and standards of the Faculty. In establishing academic regulations, the Faculty also recognizes that instances will arise where it makes sense, in the context of a student's academic career, to waive regulations which would otherwise apply. The purpose of a student academic petition is to request an exemption from a Faculty regulation or deadline. Being unfamiliar of regulations or deadlines does not constitute a valid reason for an academic petition.

    Students are expected to familiarize themselves with the University guidelines and principles regarding academic petitions before taking any steps which may have repercussions or affect their academic progress.

    Students' Responsibilities in the Academic Petition/Appeals Process

    The University has established regulations, procedures and deadlines through its legislative bodies to which students must adhere. Students are expected to monitor their progress in courses, taking into account their personal and academic circumstances, and to make the necessary adjustments to their workload to meet the requirements and deadlines. The University recognizes, however, that specific circumstances may justify waiving the regulations/requirements/deadlines on an individual basis. Request for a waiver of a regulation/requirement/deadline are initiated by an academic petition.

    Students opting to initiate an academic petition should be assured that confidentiality is a hallmark of this process.

    While it is the University's responsibility to provide students with proper information, guidance and advice, it is incumbent upon students to:

    • be aware of and adhere to all Faculty and program regulations, requirements and published deadlines;
    • familiarize themselves with their Faculty's written academic petition/appeal procedures and make requests in a timely fashion;
    • provide all documentation to support their academic petition/appeal and to do so in a timely fashion;
    • indicate and document all their relevant circumstances upon submitting their academic petition in the first instance.

    Please refer to the Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies website under Students for further petition/appeal information and forms at http://laps.yorku.ca/office-of-the-faculty-council/undergraduate-academic-petitions/.

    Petition Appeal

    An appeal is a written request for the alteration of the decision taken on a petition generally made to the same level but to another person, panel or committee. Appeals against decisions of the Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies Committee on Student Academic Petitions will be permitted only on the grounds of:

    a) new evidence, or

    b) evidence of procedural irregularity in the committee's consideration of the case.

  • Academic Warnings and Penalties
  • Students whose academic record does not meet the Faculty or program standards are subject to the academic warnings and penalties of program warning, academic warning, required withdrawal, debarment warning, debarment and academic probation.

    Program Warning for BCom, BDEM and BHRM

    Program warning

    Students who have completed less than 90 passed credits, whose cumulative grade point average is below 5.00, will be placed on program warning and may continue in the 90-credit bachelor degree only provided they meet the program warning conditions outlined below.

    Program warning conditions

    Students on program warning, within the next 24 credits taken, must raise the cumulative grade point average to at least 5.00. At no time may the cumulative grade point average fall below 2.50 upon completion of at least 24 York credits. Please refer to required withdrawal and debarment warning for further details.

    Failure to meet program warning conditions

    Students who fail to meet program warning conditions will be ineligible to continue. Students will be exited from the program and eligible to transfer to another degree program provided they meet the program standing requirements of the program they are transferring into.

    Program Warning for BPA

    Students who have completed less than 90 passed credits, whose cumulative grade point average is below 5.00 will be placed on program warning. While on program warning, students shall remain in the BPA Honours or Specialized Honours programs.

    Students on program warning, within the next 24 credits taken, must raise the cumulative grade point average to at least 5.00. At no time may the cumulative grade point average fall below 2.50 upon completion of at least 24 York credits. Please refer to required withdrawal and debarment warning for further details.

    Failure to meet program warning conditions

    Students who fail to meet program warning conditions will be ineligible to continue. Students will be exited from the program and eligible to transfer to another degree program provided they meet the program standing requirements of the program they are transferring into.

    Program Warning for BA

    Academic warning

    BA students whose, prior to completion of 90 passed credits, cumulative grade point average falls below 4.00 at the end of any session, or who enter the Faculty with a grade point average equivalent to less than 4.00 on the York scale, receive an academic warning.

    BA academic warning conditions

    BA students on academic warning must achieve a cumulative grade point average of at least 4.00 within the next 24 credits taken, or earn a sessional grade point average of at least 5.00 in the session in which that 24th credit is taken and in each subsequent session until the cumulative grade point average reaches 4.00, or be required to withdraw. Students whose cumulative grade point average on at least 24 York credits is below 2.50 will be required to withdraw for 12 months.

    Failure to meet academic warning conditions

    Students on academic warning who fail to meet the academic warning conditions must withdraw for 12 months.

    Required Withdrawal

    Students whose academic record shows marked weakness may be required to withdraw from their studies for twelve months, during which they are encouraged to identify and remedy any problems which may have contributed materially to their failure to perform up to their potential, and to reflect on their reasons for pursuing a university education. The following regulations apply to required withdrawals:

    • Grade point average below 2.50: students whose cumulative grade point average on at least 24 York credits is below 2.50 must withdraw for 12 months.
    • BA students whose grade point average is below 4.00 and equal to or greater than 2.50: students who have received an academic warning for a cumulative grade point average below 4.00 must satisfy the academic warning conditions as specified above or be required to withdraw for 12 months.

    Petition to continue without interruption

    Students who have been required to withdraw may submit a petition requesting permission to continue their studies without interruption. Students granted such a petition would be allowed to continue their studies on debarment warning.

    Reactivation after required withdrawal

    Students who have been required to withdraw may apply for reactivation after the requisite period of absence by submitting a request online at the Reactivation Web page (http://www.registrar.yorku.ca/enrol/reactivate). Students who return to their studies after such a required withdrawal (as well as those who have been allowed to continue their studies by virtue of a petition to the Committee on Petitions) receive a debarment warning.

    Debarment Warning

    Students who have been required to withdraw from the Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies or from another Faculty at York or elsewhere, receive a debarment warning upon continuing their studies in the Faculty.

    Debarment warning conditions

    Students on debarment warning must achieve a cumulative grade point average of at least 4.00 within the next 24 credits taken or earn a sessional grade point average of at least 5.00 in the session in which the 24th credit is taken and in each subsequent session until the cumulative average reaches 4.00, and must then maintain this average. Students who do not fulfill these conditions will be debarred from the University.

    Students on debarment warning are allowed to complete their subsequent 24 credits without restriction.

    Debarment

    Students who fail to meet the debarment warning conditions outlined above will be debarred from the University. Debarment, the minimum period for which is normally two years, means that the student is no longer a student at York University.

    Petition to continue without interruption

    Students who have been debarred may submit a petition requesting permission to continue their studies without interruption. Students granted such a petition would be allowed to continue their studies on academic probation.

    Reapplying after debarment

    Students who have been debarred and who wish to resume their studies must apply for re-admission through the Admissions Office http://futurestudents.yorku.ca and must provide persuasive evidence that they are ready and able to complete a degree program. Students who are re-admitted (as well as those who have been allowed to continue their studies by virtue of a petition) receive an academic probation.

    Academic Probation

    Students who have been debarred and who subsequently resume their studies in the Faculty whether by petitioning to continue without interruption or by applying for readmission, receive an academic probation. Students on academic probation must meet the debarment warning conditions outlined above; otherwise, they will be debarred.

  • Centre for Student Success
  • Academic Advising Services: 103 Central Square, Tel.: 416-736-5222, e-mail: laps@yorku.ca
    Academic Success and Student Engagement: N926 Ross Building, Tel.: 416-736-2100, ext. 70790, e-mail: mycentre@yorku.ca

    The Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies (LA&PS) is a vibrant academic community that fosters engagement, development and academic success in all phases of the student life cycle. The successful student experience will involve personal, interpersonal, intellectual and social development and empowerment.

    Student success depends upon an essential partnership between students and the University. The Centre for Student Success has been created to provide and partner with other responsible areas in the Faculty and University to deliver the successful student experience in LA&PS. Students served by the Centre for Student Success can be prospective, transitioning, continuing, graduating or alumni of LA&PS.

    Academic Advising Services

    Advising is one of the crucial activities that support student engagement and success. The Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies considers academic advising to cover a number of complementary areas related to assisting students:

    • select majors and courses;
    • change majors or degrees;
    • transferring to LA&PS;
    • ascertain whether they are meeting the Faculty's academic regulations;
    • plan for their academic future both before and after graduation;
    • and generally make the most of their talents and interests.

    The Centre for Student Success - Academic Advising Services will assist new students with the transition into their first year at York University and support them throughout the entire first year. It is responsible for providing students with the advice and information required for a successful first year experience.

    Advising continuing students is a shared responsibility of the Centre for Student Success, individual departments, divisions and programs of the Faculty. Students should contact these offices throughout the year for advice and information related to their academic career including academic performance and degree program requirements.

    Academic advisers will provide advice, guidance and support, as well as strategies and guidelines for continued educational success. They will provide accurate information of academic policies, procedures, regulations and degree requirements. They are available to answer questions and when unable to provide an answer, they will find the person who can or refer students to the appropriate resource.

    Advisers are available for new and continuing students from 9:00am to 6:30pm Monday to Thursday and 10:30am to 5:00pm on Fridays during fall/winter sessions.

    Academic Success and Student Responsibilities

    It is important for students to recognize their responsibility to familiarize themselves with the academic policies, procedures and requirements published each year in the Undergraduate Calendar. They must continually monitor their progress toward graduation and for their academic choices. Students are recommended to use the online Degree Progress Report found at http://registrar.yorku.ca/mydegreeprogress

    Students are expected to:

    • ensure the courses they choose meet all requirements for graduation;
    • ensure the courses they choose meet prerequisites and are not course credit exclusions of other courses already taken;
    • ensure the times of the courses they choose do not conflict;
    • ensure the accuracy of their registration records, including all changes;
    • note and observe deadlines and procedures, especially deadlines for adding and dropping courses;
    • ensure full documentation is provided in support of petitions and other requests for special consideration;
    • keep themselves informed about their academic progress, including their performance in individual courses;
    • ensure they are familiar with the University Code of Student Rights and Responsibilities (http://www.yorku.ca/oscr/studentconduct.html);
    • ensure they understand University Academic Integrity provisions (http://secretariat-policies.info.yorku.ca/policies/academic-honesty-senate-policy-on/).

    It is also recommended that students become familiar with the broad range of information and services available through the LA&PS website. This site has a great deal of information on the matters listed above, but also provides useful links to services such as Web enrolment, Registrarial Services in the Division of Students and Student Community and Leadership Development and Faculty-affiliated colleges.

    Student Engagement

    Get involved. Make a difference. Start your successful future now.

    The Centre for Student Success in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies (LA&PS) recognizes that students who are actively engaged achieve more and get greater benefits from their university experience. Becoming involved in the LA&PS community can help you achieve greater academic success, increase life skills such as communicating and working with others, and gain valuable experience for your resume. You can also have fun while meeting new people and networking with your fellow students. At the Centre for Student Success, we are dedicated to offering students a variety of ways to become engaged in the life of the Faculty. Whether it is putting you in touch with an academic club or inviting you to a workshop on student awards and bursaries, we will help you discover how you can get involved in the Faculty of LA&PS.

    Learn more about:

    • Academic success programs.
    • Volunteering and skills-building opportunities.
    • Awards information sessions and scholarship/awards celebrations.
    • Participation in LA&PS student clubs and Faculty governance.
    • Workshops that support academic success.
    • Student Experience Fund to support club and student initiatives.

    You will never regret getting involved!

    Contact us today to find out how you can get more out of your University years: http://laps.yorku.ca/student-resources/

  • The eServices Office
  • Location: Suite 2120 Technology Enhanced Learning Building, Tel.: 416-736-5831, Fax: 416-736-5637, Toll Free Number (in North America): 1-866-261-1790, e-mail: esohelp@yorku.ca (computing technical assistance), disted@yorku.ca (Distance Education inquiries)
    Website: http://eso.laps.yorku.ca/

    The eServices Office (eSO) in the Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies (LA&PS) provisions for the administrative needs of the Faculty’s eLearning programming which is described as online (Internet), blended (combined in-class and Internet components) and web-enhanced courses. The eSO also provides assistance for specialized needs in the fully online (Internet) course sphere, including digital assignment submission and off-site examination scheduling. The eServices Office supports the development of course outlines and websites for all LA&PS courses. Many LA&PS instructors use course websites to deposit and disseminate academic and administrative content and extend interactive virtual communication services to our student community. Instructors inform their students of their web platform and usage plans at the beginning of term.

    Distance Education Courses (Fully Online)

    Students can study at their own pace with fully online (Internet) courses and learn from the convenience of their home, office or from the other side of the world. LA&PS’ fully online (Internet) courses use the same textbooks and materials as in-class instruction and cover the same course content. In addition, they count towards your degree in exactly the same way as traditional in-class courses. Students taking fully online courses access instructional information, assignments, course requirements and relevant materials online. Students are required to complete assignments (due on specific dates) and to write supervised exams at the university or an alternative postsecondary institution as scheduled. The format for fully online course is identified as (INTR) within the university’s enrolment documentation. Students can create a more flexible schedule by mixing in-class courses with fully online (Internet) courses to possibly complete an entire program by distance.

    Programs Offered Fully Online (Internet)

    LA&PS offers a Bachelor of Administrative Studies (BAS) degree and a management certificate entirely online. Detailed degree requirements, prerequisites and descriptions are available online in the Undergraduate Calendar available at http://calendars.registrar.yorku.ca.

    Blended Courses (In-class + Internet)

    In addition to fully online courses, LA&PS offers many new blended courses which combine in-class and online modes of delivery. Blended courses combine the best of both teaching methods. On-campus lectures may be reduced by approximately 30-70% and replaced with online instruction and activities. Course instructors will announce the blended organization of the course at the beginning of term. The course format for blended is identified as (LECI) within the university’s enrolment documentation.

    Additional Information

    Detailed information is available at  http://elearning.laps.yorku.ca/. This site includes information for registered students such as computer requirements/accounts, access instructions and specialized administrative information. Course listings and timetables are navigated from the York Courses website page available at https://w2prod.sis.yorku.ca/Apps/WebObjects/cdm/. Once you find your course offering, there will be a course website link that includes the outline. The course outline contains academic and text requirements.

  • School and Department Contact Information
  • School of Administrative Studies

    Location: 282 Atkinson Building, Tel.: 416-736-5210, Fax: 416-650-8485
    Website: http://sas.laps.yorku.ca/
    Director: Adriano Solis
    Undergraduate Program Director: Marcela Porporato
    Coordinators of Administrative Studies: Auditing Management Information Systems and Tax: Joanne Jones
    Financial Accounting and Governance: Songlan (Stella) Peng
    Business Minor: You-Ta Chuang
    Emergency Management: Ali Asgary
    Finance: Nabil Tahani
    Introduction to Administrative Studies: Len Karakowsky
    Management and Ethics: You-Ta Chuang
    Management Accounting  and Law: Gary Spraakman
    Management Science: R. Huang
    Marketing: K. Snow

    The School of Administrative Studies is home to a full range of business and management programs and courses taught by leading experts in a variety of fields. We provide the knowledge and skills that you want and employers demand.

    Whether you are planning to pursue a career in business and management, or are already working and want to expand your knowledge of business concepts and practices, the bachelor’s and master’s programs (BAS, Honours BAS, BDEM, Honours BDEM, MDEM, MFACC) will prepare you to meet the challenges and opportunities ahead.

    Department of Anthropology

    Location: 2054 Vari Hall, Tel.: 416-736-5261
    Website: http://anth.laps.yorku.ca/
    Chair: Albert Schrauwers

    Anthropology is a social science that examines who and what we are, how we came to be, and where we might be going in the future. The discipline of anthropology explores diverse ways of knowing, forms of action and expression. Anthropologists study the social, cultural, political, economic and religious forces that shape our lives, our relationships with one another and our environments. The breadth of anthropology becomes apparent when looking at the range of courses this department offers. Our courses offer dynamic environments where you will learn about global diversity and the complex forces that shape our world. Our courses explore a wide variety of topics such as: development and the environment, media and popular culture, health, illness and disability, gender and sexualities, tourism, religion and science, diasporic communities and displaced peoples, violence and conflict, and the colonial process. Other courses focus on processes of change in the prehistoric and historic past.

    Department of Communication Studies

    Location: 3004 Victor Phillip Dahdaleh Building, Tel.: 416-736-5057
    Website: http://comn.laps.yorku.ca/
    Chair: David Skinner
    Undergraduate Program Director: Mary-Louise Craven

    The Department of Communication Studies provides students with a comprehensive understanding of traditional forms of mass communication: print, radio, film and television, while also examining the interactive telecommunications networks and computer systems that have introduced new media and new modes of communication.

    The emphasis is academic rather than technical or professional. We aim to produce graduates who have acquired skills in communications analysis, who understand the increasingly complex fields of communications and who can clearly communicate their knowledge.

    The courses offered by this program encompass three thematic areas: Media, Culture and Society; Politics and Policy; and Critical Technology Studies.

    Students may be interested in augmenting their Honours undergraduate degree in communication studies with graduate studies or media-specific training at an Ontario community college (for details visit http://comn.laps.yorku.ca/).

    Selected course offerings: Communications and Development; Politics, Policy and the Media; Media Culture and Society; Advertising and Society and a fourth-year field experience course which provides students with an internship in the for-profit or not-for-profit communications fields.

    Department of Economics

    Location: 1144 Vari Hall, Tel.: 416-736-5083, Fax: 416-736-5987
    Website: http://econ.laps.yorku.ca/
    Chair: Ida Ferrara
    Undergraduate Program Director: Neil Buckley

    The Department of Economics within the Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies offers an academic program leading to degrees in economics at the BA, Honours BA and Specialized Honours BA levels, business economics at the BA level, and financial and business economics at the Specialized Honours BA level.

    Through a unique teaching approach that blends theory and application, students in our program are introduced to the analytical and quantitative tools of economic analysis and learn to apply them to a wide range of individual and social problems which arise out of the conflict between unlimited wants and limited resources to satisfy them. They may focus on management issues in applied business fields or on financial markets and instruments or, more generally, on those aspects of social behaviour and those institutions which are involved in the allocation of scarce resources among alternative uses. In an intellectually stimulating environment, our students become skilled at identifying economic problems, at developing and applying economic theory to improve upon their understanding of the problems and their ability to solve them, and at evaluating the adequacy of their theoretical understanding through the use of data and empirical testing.

    Our graduates are well prepared to begin or advance in a variety of careers in business, government and the not-for-profit sector and to pursue graduate studies in economics or professional training in business, law, public administration, and other disciplines.

    Department of English

    Location: 208 Stong College, Tel.: 416-736-5166
    Website: http://en.laps.yorku.ca/
    Chair: Heather Campbell
    Undergraduate Program Director: Elizabeth Pentland

    The Department of English offers a variety of courses in the literature of the English language. There are courses in historical periods ranging from medieval to contemporary, in the literature of several nations (Canadian and post-colonial as well as English and American), in various literary genres such as poetry, fiction, drama, non-fictional prose and criticism and in literary theory. In addition, during their final 36 credits, Honours English majors may propose their own thesis (AP/EN 4099 6.00).

    The department also offers a Specialized Honours BA in English.

    Department of Equity Studies

    Location: 302 Atkinson Building, Tel.: 416-736-5235, Fax: 416-650-3876
    Website: http://des.laps.yorku.ca/
    Chair: Minoo Derayeh
    Undergraduate Program Director: Livy Visano

    The Department of Equity Studies (DES) offers a learning environment that values diversity and supports social equality. It provides students with an understanding of the social environments that shape their interests, opportunities, and identities. Students gain a solid and critical grounding in research methods and theories in ways that allow them to link their education with various types of degrees and certificates.

    Graduates of the Department of Equity Studies will be well positioned to work in a wide range of areas with organizations, government, industry and communities that have programs, policies and procedures around the equitable treatment and experiences of Indigenous peoples, racialized peoples, immigrants and refugees, as well as in the area of human rights advocacy and redress.

    The department offers two undergraduate degree programs.

    • The Human Rights and Equity Studies (HREQ) degree program addresses the full range of human rights and equities issues: children’s rights, women’s rights, language rights, the rights of persons with disabilities and persons facing discrimination, economic and political rights and the rights of working people. Students explore the ethical principles of human rights as well as the roots and impact of human rights violations and efforts at redress.
    • The Multicultural and Indigenous Studies (MIST) degree program represents the “cutting edge” in social justice studies, diaspora and globalization studies, bringing together established strengths in anti-racism and social justice with the growing development of Indigenous studies at York University.

    The Department of Equity Studies also provides:

    • General education six-credit courses.
    • Certificate in Anti-Racist Research and Practice (CARRP) addresses racism and racial issues in the workplace, schools, healthcare, immigration, law enforcement, media and the expressive arts. Students who complete the certificate and are accepted into the Social Work program will be eligible to count up to 12 certificate credits.
    • Certificate in Indigenous Studies addresses the experiences of Indigenous people including issues in language, history and culture. This certificate offers a range of courses that provide a unique focus on the history of the relationship between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people in Canada.
    • Certificate in Refugee and Migration Studies (in conjunction with the Centre for Refugee Studies) addresses issues concerning ethnic communities, gender, racism, migration, policy, cultural identity and international relations, augmenting the student’s work in the field or professional life. This certificate participation in the Centre for Refugee Studies seminar series is required.

    Department of French Studies

    Location: N727 Ross Building, Tel.: 416-736-5086, e-mail: lapsfren@yorku.ca
    Website: http://fr.laps.yorku.ca/
    Chair: Dominique Scheffel-Dunand
    Undergraduate Program Director: Leila Young

    The Department of French Studies offers an interdisciplinary set of courses in the three curricular areas of French language, linguistics and literature. A sequence of language-skills courses with cultural content allows students to develop their proficiency in oral and written French. The core curriculum includes as well courses in French linguistics (syntax, semantics, phonetics and sociolinguistics), and courses in literature of the francophone world with a special emphasis on French and French-Canadian literature. In addition to Honours BA, international BA and BA degree programs, the Department of French Studies offers Certificates of Language Proficiency in Basic French, Intermediate French and Advanced French, either in general French language proficiency or with a focus on business.

    Le département d'études françaises (DÉF) offre au niveau du B.A et iBA un programme interdisciplinaire de cours dans trois domaines d'étude: langue, linguistique et littérature.

    Dans le programme de langue, les cours visent à développer chez les étudiant-e-s l'expression orale et écrite et la compréhension orale et écrite tout en leur donnant l'occasion d'explorer les aspects multiples de la culture francophone dans le monde.

    Le programme de linguistique familiarise les étudiant-e-s avec les différentes branches de la linguistique (syntaxe, sémantique, phonétique, sociolinguistique etc.) et les expose à un pluralisme théorique et méthodologique.

    Le programme de littérature offre des cours axés sur les littératures et les cultures du monde francophone avec une concentration sur les littératures française et canadienne-française. Il permet aux étudiant-e-s d'acquérir des compétences en analyse et en interprétation de textes tout en leur présentant diverses approches théoriques et méthodologiques.

    Le département offre aussi des certificats de compétence en français, général ou avec concentration sur le commerce, aux niveaux élémentaire, intermédiaire et avancé.

    School of Gender, Sexuality and Women's Studies

    Location: 206 Founders College, Tel.: 416-650-8144
    Website: http://gsws.laps.yorku.ca/
    Chair: Jacinthe Michaud
    Director of Undergraduate Programs: Eva Karpinski

    The School of Gender, Sexuality and Women’s Studies offers interdisciplinary courses on women, gender and sexuality that encourage students to develop the practical, theoretical, communications, and organizational skills to think, write and act critically and creatively. Students will gain the skills necessary to conduct research and transform the knowledge gained into any future career they may choose, including continuing as a graduate student. Our interdisciplinary courses explore relations of power in the lives of individuals, groups and cultures in a multiplicity of settings and sites locally and transnationally. The rich, interdisciplinary feminist scholarship in both the Gender and Women’s Studies degree program and the Sexuality Studies degree program pushes students to interrogate constructions and intersections of gender, race, class, age, ability and sexuality in daily life, popular culture, the arts, the sciences, politics, society, the economy etc. We encourage students to engage individually and collectively in the transformative processes of feminist interdisciplinary scholarship, practices and politics.

    The School of Gender, Sexuality and Women's Studies unites academic resources at York University in gender and women's studies, and sexuality studies, bringing together the undergraduate programs, the Graduate Program in Gender, Feminist and Women’s Studies, the non-credit Bridging Program for women and the Centre for Feminist Research. Courses may be taken in English in the Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies or in English or in French at Glendon College.

    Department of Geography

    Location: N430 Ross Building, Tel.: 416-736-5107
    Website: http://geography.laps.yorku.ca/
    Chair: Joseph Mensah
    Undergraduate Program Director: Tarmo Remmel

    Geography is a unique discipline in that it rests on all the three pillars of intellectual life: physical sciences, social sciences and humanities. The discipline is concerned with the interrelationships among the earth’s physical and human environments. Geographers at York study climate change, resource depletion, human migration, globalization, geopolitics, poverty, inequality and vulnerability-their causes, consequences and implications on urban and regional development. We ask questions about how environmental, economic, social, political and cultural processes shape how the world functions or fails to function. These concerns take us from the local neighbourhoods in Toronto to Asia, Africa, Latin America, the Canadian Arctic and the Arizona desert. They offer students opportunities to understand and explore different dimensions of the world in which we live and offers a synthetic approach to understanding landscapes, people, places and environments. Our courses are divided into seven themes, each of which includes regional and systematic courses:

    • The City;
    • Globalization, Environment and Development;
    • Production and the Politics of Difference;
    • State, Empire and Power;
    • Extreme Environments;
    • Biophysical Processes and
    • Geoinformatics.

    Students are exposed to the breadth of geography in Years 1 and 2 and encouraged to specialize in one or more of these themes in Years 3 and 4.

    Department of History

    Location: 2140 Vari Hall, Tel.: 416-736-5123
    Website: http://history.laps.yorku.ca/
    Chair: Jonathan Edmondson
    Undergraduate Program Director: Deb Neill

    History is an exciting and dynamic discipline that is always asking fascinating new questions about the past and answering important old questions in new ways. The study of history teaches us to think critically about how the past is fundamentally similar to the present, how the past is utterly different from the present, how the past is profoundly influential in shaping the present and how the past is recalled and remembered in the present.

    The Department of History offers courses covering thousands of years of history in Africa, Asia, Europe and the Americas. At the 1000 level, students are introduced to the discipline of history through courses that emphasize theory, method and historiography, and that concentrate on fundamental reading, writing, research and analytic skills. At the 2000 level, students are introduced to major chronological and geographic fields of history. More specialized courses are offered at the 3000 level, while 4000-level seminars and colloquia enable small groups of Honours students to focus on specific historical topics.

    Courses at the 1000 level have either a lecture/tutorial or seminar format. Courses at the 2000 level normally have two lecture hours and one tutorial hour. Courses at the 3000 level are taught as colloquia, lecture/tutorial or lecture courses. 4000-level courses will be offered as two- or three-hour seminars or colloquia. All courses are open to students studying in other units, unless otherwise indicated.

    All history courses are numbered and grouped according to field. The thousands digit indicates the level at which the course is offered, the hundreds digit indicates the field (general 000, ancient 100, medieval and early modern Europe 200, modern Europe 300, Great Britain 400, Canada 500, United States 600, Africa, Asia, Latin America and Caribbean 700, comparative and interdisciplinary 800), and the remaining two digits indicate the number of the course within the field.

    Department of Humanities

    Location: 262 Vanier College, Tel.: 416-736-5158
    Website: http://huma.laps.yorku.ca/
    Chair: Andrea Davis
    Undergraduate Program Director: Susan Warwick

    The Department of Humanities offers a broadly-based program of interdisciplinary study emphasizing the different ways in which human cultures and their multiple forms of expression have developed historically and continue to develop today. Humanities courses devote particular attention to the cultural practices of peoples in various times and places and the ways they have expressed cultural values and ideas of a philosophical, religious, moral, political and aesthetic nature. They foster a critical approach to reading and research that, in helping students learn to identify and question preconceived assumptions and values, allows them to engage and appreciate the interrelationship between diverse value systems and thereby to develop an analysis of the human and of human community. Courses offered in the Department of Humanities stress careful scrutiny of texts and cultural artefacts, critical thinking, reading, writing, seminar discussion and close contact between teacher and student.

    The Department of Humanities offers Honours BA, Honours iBA and BA degrees in humanities which allow students to take advantage of a wide range of courses addressing important themes in the liberal arts. The department also offers Honours BA, Honours iBA and BA degrees in Canadian studies, children's studies, classics, classical and Hellenic studies, culture and expression, East Asian studies, European studies, individualized studies, Jewish studies and Religious studies. The department also participates in the Latin American and Caribbean Studies and Science and Technology Studies programs. Many humanities courses reflect these areas of concentration, thereby ensuring that humanities students have a wide range of course options to select from. For details, please consult the Programs of Study section.

    Most first- and second-year courses offered through the Department of Humanities count towards the general education requirements of the Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies (see General Education Requirements). In addition to six-credit general education courses, the Department of Humanities offers nine-credit foundations courses that place additional emphasis on developing critical thinking, reading and writing skills, and modes of reasoning courses that build critical reasoning skills.

    School of Human Resource Management

    Location: 150 Atkinson Building, Tel.: 416-736-5806, Fax: 416-736-5188
    Website: http://shrm.laps.yorku.ca/
    Director: Marie-Hélène Budworth
    Undergraduate Program Director: Souha Ezzedeen

    Established in 2009, the School of Human Resource Management is the only HR School in Canada with full-time faculty dedicated to the study of HRM. The School offers two undergraduate (BHRM and BHRM Honours) streams and two innovative graduate programs: masters of human resource management and a PhD in HRM. It also offers a Professional Certificate in Human Resources Management.

    School of Information Technology

    Location: 3068 Victor Phillip Dahdaleh Building, Tel.: 416-736-2100 (ext. 22647 or 40797), Fax: 416-736-5287
    Website: http://itec.laps.yorku.ca/
    Director: Sotirios Liaskos
    Undergraduate Program Director: Stephen Chen

    The School of Information Technology prepares IT professionals for various career paths that require superior core technical and non-technical skills as well as organizational, communication, problem solving and critical thinking skills. The graduates of the Information Technology programs are uniquely positioned to plan, analyze, design, build, administer and audit information systems. They are familiar with the latest technologies and are capable of customizing and integrating them according to the users’ needs.

    Department of Languages, Literatures and Linguistics

    Location: S561 Ross Building, Tel.: 416-736-5016
    Website: http://dlll.laps.yorku.ca/
    Chair: Roberta Iannacito-Provenzano
    Undergraduate Program Director (Languages and Literatures): Roberta Iannacito-Provenzano
    Undergraduate Program Director (Linguistics): Gabriela Albiou

    The Department of Languages, Literatures and Linguistics offers one of the widest selections of languages of any Canadian university: American Sign Language, Arabic, Chinese (Mandarin), German, Greek (both Classical and Modern), Hebrew, Hindi-Urdu, Jamaican Creole, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Latin, Persian, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili and Yiddish. The ESL section fosters the developing abilities of domestic and international students to use English for academic purposes, allowing them to engage more fully in their programs. The study of foreign languages and literatures makes communication possible among people of different linguistic and cultural backgrounds and fosters intercultural understanding. This enables our students to engage the global community thoughtfully and creatively.

    The department also offers courses in linguistics, the discipline concerned with discovering the organizing principles of human language and applying these principles to the description of individual languages. Linguistics attempts to answer questions about the structure of languages, about how languages are alike and how they differ, about how children acquire language, about the relation between language and thought, language perception and production, as well as language and society. As a result, the study of linguistics can provide new perspectives on almost every aspect of the humanities and social sciences.

    The department offers courses leading to Honours BA and BA degrees in German Studies, Italian Culture, Italian studies, linguistics, Portuguese studies and Spanish, as well as graduate MA and PhD degrees in linguistics and applied linguistics. The department also offers Certificates of Language Proficiency in Chinese, German, Italian, Japanese, Modern Greek, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish, as well as a Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL).  Students may also take courses in Hebrew towards an Advanced Certificate in Hebrew and Jewish Studies, offered by the Department of Humanities. The department’s language programs, through their various courses and language proficiency certificates, contribute to a variety of area studies and interdisciplinary programs: African Studies, Business and Society, Classical Studies, East Asian Studies, Environmental Studies, European Studies, Hellenic Studies, International Development Studies, Jewish Studies, Latin American and Caribbean Studies, South Asian Studies, Religious Studies and Women’s Studies. The department's language programs may also contribute to a variety of graduate program such as Development Studies. For specific program requirements, certificate requirements and course listings, please consult the Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies Programs of Study section.

    Languages and Literatures

    Section Language Coordinator Location Ext. E-mail
    Chinese Pietro Giordan 221 Founders College 66918 giordanp@yorku.ca
    ESL Antonella Valeo S540 Ross Building 33794 antvaleo@yorku.ca
    German studies Gabriele Mueller S524 Ross Building 66829 gmueller@yorku.ca
    Hebrew Ahouva Shulman S573 Ross Building 88727 sahouva@yorku.ca
    Italian studies Gabriella Colussi-Arthur 235 Founders College 23094 gcolussi@yorku.ca
    Japanese/Korean Norio Ota S532 Ross Building 88750 nota@yorku.ca
    Spanish/Portuguese studies Michol Hoffman S504 Ross Building 88734 mhoffman@yorku.ca

    Department of Philosophy

    Location: S448 Ross Building, Tel.: 416-736-5113, Fax: 416-736-5114
    Website: http://phil.laps.yorku.ca/
    Chair: Muhammad-Ali Khalidi
    Undergraduate Program Director: Michael Giudice

    The Department of Philosophy offers a wide range of undergraduate courses which examine contemporary problems and issues in applied ethics, social and political philosophy, feminism, cognitive science, philosophy of mind and argumentation theory. In addition, courses are offered in the history of philosophy, continental thought, and other traditional areas such as metaphysics and epistemology, logic and the philosophy of language, moral philosophy, and the philosophy of law.

    The department is open to many avenues of thought and to diverse ways of doing philosophy. Efforts are made to blend contemporary and historical perspectives, and our faculty draws its inspiration from widely separated philosophical approaches. In keeping with this, there is a great deal of interdisciplinary work, and philosophy is involved in numerous cross-disciplinary programs.

    The 24 full-time department members, among whom are some highly praised and very well-known scholars, are supplemented by visiting and contract faculty who offer further diversity and breadth.

    Department of Political Science

    Location: S672 Ross Building, Tel.: 416-736-5265
    Website: http://pols.laps.yorku.ca/
    Chair: David Mutimer
    Undergraduate Program Director: Dennis Pilon

    The Department of Political Science is a vibrant community of scholars, practitioners, dedicated teachers and engaged citizens. With our large faculty (over 50 full-time members) leading at many frontiers of research, we offer political science with the kind of depth and breadth that few departments in the world can match. Our graduates have made distinctive and successful careers in law, policy and government, international organizations, media, education (elementary and secondary), academia and in the private sector. Visit our website to see where our graduates are today.

    Our courses offer an exciting breadth of areas – including global politics, law and politics, political economy, political theory, women and politics, Canadian politics, public policy and politics of specific areas such as the Middle East, Europe, India, China, Russia, Africa, and Latin America.

    The first two years of our program will give you a thorough grounding in the ideas, concepts, and skills you need for your upper year courses. Our most distinguished teachers teach our first- and second-year classes. They will prepare you for an exciting array of elective courses in the following years. Depending on your interests and future plans, you can acquire specialized knowledge in many different issues/areas. We also offer a specialized Honors degree in global political studies.

    With our location in one of the most diverse places in the globe, we attract a student body that is also as diverse. Our students bring with them a wealth of experience and worldviews that create a unique learning environment. Here you will learn not only from books, but also from the society in which we live. With this exposure, you will be ready to excel in any profession as a skilled global citizen.

    Our goal is to bring to our students a political science that is living, relevant, and dynamic – something that profoundly shapes the lives we live – but that can also be shaped by us – with our knowledge and our actions.

    School of Public Policy and Administration

    Location: 119 McLaughlin College, Tel.: 416-736-5384, Fax: 416-736-5384
    Website: http://sppa.laps.yorku.ca/
    Director: Alena Kimakova
    Undergraduate Program Director: Joanne Magee

    The School of Public Policy and Administration brings together the interdisciplinary research and teaching experience of its highly regarded faculty to offer both degree and certificate programs. The School’s mission is “Education for Good Governance”. The Bachelor or Public Administration (BPA) offers both an interdisciplinary and balanced education. The program provides students the opportunity to learn essential analytic skills and managerial skills, combined with a suitable breadth of education, so that they cannot only identify challenges, but also effectively act on them. The graduate degree program of the school is the executive-style master’s degree in Public Policy, Administration and Law (MPPAL). The school also offers a graduate Diploma in Justice System Administration and two undergraduate professional certificates: Professional Certificate in Public Administration and Law and a Professional Certificate in Public Policy Analysis.

    The school prepares graduates for careers ranging from the private to the not-for-profit and public sectors as well as for post-graduate studies in the social sciences and professional programs.

    Department of Social Science

    Location: S737 Ross Building, Tel.: 416-736-5054
    Website: http://sosc.laps.yorku.ca/
    Chair: Amanda Glasbeek
    Undergraduate Program Director: Peggy Keall

    Traditionally, the social sciences are understood to be those academic fields of study that employ a scientific method to explore social phenomenon. Social Science at York breaks from this narrow tradition to provide students with a progressive, innovative and truly interdisciplinary learning environment.

    The Department of Social Science is part of the larger Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies and is currently home to 11 distinctive interdisciplinary degree programs. In line with the general mandate of York University, the Department of Social Science is strongly orientated, both in teaching and research, toward issues of social justice and sustainability.

    All programs offered through the Department of Social Science reflect a sustained dedication to critical, interdisciplinary approaches to the study of social relations, social structures, social identities and social phenomena. That is to say, our courses and programs ground their analysis of social practices and relations in and across a range of disciplines and fields of study. Offering a variety of degree and certificate options, our interdisciplinary programs include:

    • African Studies
    • Business and Society
    • Criminology
    • Health and Society
    • Interdisciplinary Social Science
    • International Development Studies
    • Latin American and Caribbean Studies
    • Law and Society
    • South Asian Studies
    • Work and Labour Studies
    • Urban Studies

    While enrolment in some of our courses is restricted to program majors, the Department of Social Science is also committed to the development and delivery of general education courses in the social sciences that all students can take as partial fulfilment of their general education requirements. The interdisciplinary general education curriculum offered through the Department of Social Science provides students with a breadth of knowledge with an interdisciplinary orientation, assists in acculturating students to the scholarly life of the university and offers critical learning skills for successful study in liberal arts and professional programs. Students may choose between nine-credit or six-credit social science foundation courses offered at the 1000-level. The nine-credit courses in the Department of Social Science feature two-hour tutorials that place special emphasis on developing critical thinking, reading and writing skills that provide students with a firm basis for success in their academic careers.

    School of Social Work

    Location: S880 Ross Building, Tel.: 416-736-5226, Fax: 416-650-3861
    Website: http://sowk.laps.yorku.ca/
    Director: Andrea Daley
    Undergraduate Program Directors: Maurice Poon

    The School of Social Work is committed to providing professional social work education, characterized by the development of practice strategies that promote human rights and social justice. Recognized as one of the most progressive and socially responsive social work programs in Canada, the school’s unique curriculum explores how critical social work practice, critical theories, research, advocacy and social policies can account for and challenge oppression and marginalization. York students are equipped for professional practice in a number social work arenas, from work with individuals and families to practice with communities, policy, research and international settings.

    Department of Sociology

    Location: 2060 Vari Hall, Tel.: 416-736-5015
    Website: http://soci.laps.yorku.ca/
    Chair: Philip Walsh
    Undergraduate Program Director: Deborah Davidson

    Sociology majors learn a methodology to study people and  the roles they adopt in society as individuals and in groups, through exploration of social relations, interactions and power dynamics, thereby gaining a comprehensive understanding of how human action and consciousness shape and are shaped by surrounding cultural and social structures. Among the vast range of topics that sociology explores, a few taught by faculty in our department are: race and racism, crime and social regulation, social policy, work and labour, gender, Canadian society, immigration, education, health and healthcare, social organizations, culture, poverty, social interaction, socialization and criminal justice systems.

    Writing Department

    Location: S311 Ross Building, Tel.: 416-736-5134
    Website: http://writing.laps.yorku.ca/
    Chair: Ron Sheese
    Undergraduate Program Director: Kerry Doyle

    The Writing Department offers courses within a professional writing degree program as well as a variety of other credit courses which may be taken to help students develop their research and writing skills, both academic and professional. The department is also the home of the Writing Centre, which provides one-to-one and non-credit group instruction as described below.

    Writing Centre

    The Writing Department’s Writing Centre provides students with one-to-one instruction designed to assist students to become effective independent writers both in their academic life and beyond. Instruction is based on students' course assignments, usually on the draft of an essay, or other writing assignment, in progress. All Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies students, at any stage of a particular course assignment, are welcome to make appointments and take advantage of the opportunity to work on their writing with one of the centre's experienced faculty. Some students in other Faculties also may use the centre (information available on the Writing Department website). Appointments are for 50 minutes and are available in the day Monday through Saturday as well as evenings Monday through Thursday. The centre also regularly offers group workshops on various issues and skills related to writing effectively in university.

    Dean: A. Mukherjee-Reed
    Associate Deans: P. Avery, J. J. McMurtry, K. McPherson, N. Razack, S. Whitworth
    Office of the Dean: S949 Ross Building, 416-736-5220